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Folks, I'm new to Scala and am trying to figure something out. I've been messing around a bit with traits and I really like their ability to "mix in" functionality and interface. I've also been messing around with concurrency and Actors and I really like the ability I get to model highly complicated concurrent systems easily.

The problem I'm having is I can't quite find a pattern for combining both worlds. What I'm really looking for is using traits to determine which types of messages an Actor responds to, allowing for different responses across inheritance hierarchies.

So, to use a battlefield simulator example: I have Simulants, which are traits. All objects on the battlefield are Simulants, and Simulants should respond to "Ping" by sending "Pong" - this is it. I want an IFF trait, which will allow a simulant to identify itself as a friend or foe of the message sender. Another trait should be Mobile, which means the simulant can move and should respond to messages telling the simulant its new destination.

As you can see, I might have : class Tank extends Actor with Simulant with IFF with Mobile , but I might have something like a barrier, e.g. class Barrier extends Actor with Simulant.

What I have not yet been able to do is create the right combination of act() methods, loops, reacts, and so forth to make this scenario possible. In short, is it possible to "mix in message reactors" or does Scala limit me to choosing Actors with single inheritance or mixins without actors?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
You may want to look at this, as you are basically trying to pattern match on traits: gleichmann.wordpress.com/2009/07/19/… – James Black Jul 13 '11 at 21:13
    
Yes, I saw that article. My issue here is that, if you'll notice, that article doesn't show message reception (via the ! or !! or !? etc operators) within a trait. – Kevin Hoffman Jul 13 '11 at 23:54
    
I've made a design decision as to which ob hierarchy will be the main actor, which will in turn be the <i>one and only one</i> definer of the act() method. Having multiple definers of the act method has been my multiple inheritance bane up to this point. With the single message listener defined, what I do is have each trait file (TraitXXX.scala) contain the relevant case classes. The main actor reacts to those messages, grabs the payload, and then forwards said payload to methods in the trait. E.g. Tank will receive an IFF(isFoe) message and call the reactToIff(isFo) method in the IFF trait. – Kevin Hoffman Jul 13 '11 at 23:57

What about this?

trait Simulant {
  def body: PartialFunction[Any, Unit] = {
    case Ping => reply(Pong)
  }

  def act = loop { react(body) }
}

trait IFF extends Simulant {
  override def body = super.body orElse {
    case FriendOrFoe => ...
  }
}

trait Mobile extends Simulant {
  override def body = super.body orElse {
    case Move(direction) => ...
  }
}

EDIT: I've just tried this and it compiles fine for me:

aromanov@alexey-desktop:~$ scala
Welcome to Scala version 2.9.0.1 (OpenJDK Client VM, Java 1.6.0_22).
Type in expressions to have them evaluated.
Type :help for more information.

scala> object A {
     | import scala.actors.Actor
     | trait Simulant extends Actor {
     |   def body: PartialFunction[Any, Unit] = {
     |     case Ping => reply(Pong)
     |   }
     | 
     |   def act = loop { react(body) }
     | }
     | 
     | trait IFF extends Simulant {
     |   override def body = super.body orElse {
     |     case FriendOrFoe => {}  
     |   }
     | }
     | 
     | trait Mobile extends Simulant {
     |   override def body = super.body orElse {
     |     case Move(direction) => {}
     |   }
     | }
     | 
     | class Foo extends Actor with Simulant with IFF with Mobile
     | 
     | object Ping
     | object Pong
     | object FriendOrFoe
     | case class Move(direction: Int)
     | }
defined module A

On the other hand, it doesn't seem to actually work: when I replace case Ping => println("pinged"), I don't see it:

scala> (new A.Foo) ! A.Ping

scala>
share|improve this answer
    
This only works in single inheritance mode. Even though I'm using a trait, that trait has to have a clear single inheritance line in order for the partial methods to apply in the right order for message processing. The ultimate goal was to be able to add any arbitrary trait into an object. As mentioned in my above comment, what I've been doing is the trait comes with state and methods and the trait -file- contains messages that are related ... and then it's up to the real actor to decide what to do with those messages, typically just catching them in a 'react' and then calling the method. – Kevin Hoffman Jul 14 '11 at 13:42
    
In other words, I'll get illegal inheritance errors when I try to create a class that "extends Actor with Simulant with IFF with Mobile". Your idea is the one I've been trying to get work for a couple weeks and I haven't gotten any variants of it to compile. – Kevin Hoffman Jul 14 '11 at 13:44
    
"Even though I'm using a trait, that trait has to have a clear single inheritance line in order for the partial methods to apply in the right order for message processing." Look at ofps.oreilly.com/titles/9780596155957/… for precise rules. I don't see why you would have problem (so far as IFF, Mobile, etc. are traits and not classes). – Alexey Romanov Jul 14 '11 at 14:37
1  
@Alexy I think you just need to .start() your actor? – Brian Sep 13 '12 at 4:10
    
@Brian Yes, you are right. – Alexey Romanov Sep 14 '12 at 5:47
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I did a blog post up on this problem and the compromise that I've found for solving the problem.

http://www.kotancode.com/2011/07/19/traits-multiple-inheritance-and-actors-in-scala/

share|improve this answer
    
As mentioned above, my issue wasn't with determining the order in which super methods are overridden - my problem was I wanted to mix in two entirely different traits that had -nothing- in common, both of which responded to messages. Hence the compromise I ended up with in my blog. – Kevin Hoffman Jul 22 '11 at 13:15

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