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On the Twitter Client example at Knockoutjs some properties are in the JSON object and others are assigned outside the JSON variable. What is the difference? Why can't the methods (findSavedList) just be a part of the initial declaration?

var viewModel = {
    savedLists: ko.observableArray([ ... ]),
    editingList: { ...  },
    userNameToAdd : ko.observable(""),
    currentTweets : ko.observableArray([])
};

viewModel.findSavedList = function (name) {
   ...
};
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Your viewModel is not a JSON object. –  epascarello Jul 13 '11 at 21:23
3  
That's not JSON. See benalman.com/news/2010/03/theres-no-such-thing-as-a-json –  James Jul 13 '11 at 21:24
    
Thanks for clearing that up. So is viewModel just an object literal? –  Tom H. Jul 13 '11 at 21:28
    
@Tom: Yes. It's an object literal. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 13 '11 at 21:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just from the code in the question, I don't see any reason it couldn't have been written like so:

var viewModel = {
    savedLists: ko.observableArray([ ... ]),
    editingList: { ...  },
    userNameToAdd : ko.observable(""),
    currentTweets : ko.observableArray([]),
    findSavedList: function (name) {
       ...
    }
};

Looking at the actual example, I think they just wanted to write the functions separately — maybe for readability?

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There's no reason that methods can't; it's stylistic.

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Neither of the things you've quoted is JSON. JSON is a textual notation for data exchange. What you've quoted is JavaScript code.

To answer your question, there's no reason that the function couldn't have been defined within the object literal:

var viewModel = {
    savedLists: ko.observableArray([ ... ]),
    editingList: { ...  },
    userNameToAdd : ko.observable(""),
    currentTweets : ko.observableArray([]),
    findSavedList: function(name) {
       ...
   }
};

The author may have broken them up for clarity.


About my JSON comment above: JSON is a subset of JavaScript literal notation. The above is straight JavaScript literal notation. You never need JSON inside JavaScript code; you only need JSON when you're passing data around encoded in textual form. If it were meant to be JSON, it would be invalid. In JSON, property names (keys) must be in double quotes, and you can't have expressions on the right-hand side of a property initializer (so, no calling ko.observeableArray). More on the JSON site.

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To add to your comments: JSON also cannot contain functions. –  Matt Ball Jul 14 '11 at 13:16
1  
@Matt: Well, those would be expressions. :-) But still worth calling out. –  T.J. Crowder Jul 14 '11 at 13:38

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