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I am trying to write a generic comparison routine. However, some of the items in my class are in Collections and I need to enumerate to compare.

Is there an easy way, without a try/catch block to determine is a variable supports GetEnumerator()

share|improve this question
    
Interfaces are your friends. – jlafay Jul 13 '11 at 21:25
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The answers suggesting you check to see if the object is an IEnumerable are reasonably spot on. It's going to be the case the overwhelming majority of the time that your collection or object will implement that interface if it supports enumeration. But it is not required.

For something to be enumerated in a foreach, it really only needs to expose a GetEnumerator() method that returns an object with suitable MoveNext() and Current implementations. Consider something like:

class CustomCollection
{
    public CustomEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new CustomEnumerator();
    }
}

class CustomEnumerator
{
    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        return (++this.Current <= 10);
    }

    public int Current { get; private set; }
}

You can put new CustomCollection() into a loop and get the values 1..10.

By all means, check for the interface first. If that's all you want to support, fine. If you want to go that extra mile, you'd need to perform steps like the compiler would, as in check for the appropriate methods and return types. Here's a thoroughly untested draft of an implementation.

bool IsEnumerable(object obj)
{
    if (obj is IEnumerable)
        return true;

    var info = obj.GetType().GetMethod("GetEnumerator");
    if (info != null)
    {
        if (info.ReturnType != null)
        {
            var moveNextMethod = info.ReturnType.GetMethod("MoveNext");
            if (moveNextMethod != null && moveNextMethod.ReturnType == typeof(bool))
            {
                var currentProperty = info.ReturnType.GetProperty("Current");
                if (currentProperty != null)
                    return true;
            }
        }
    }

    return false;
}

Some quick tests in LinqPad, but by no means exhaustive...

IsEnumerable(new CustomCollection()).Dump(); // true
IsEnumerable(1).Dump(); // false 
IsEnumerable(new List<int>()).Dump(); // true
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting. – Rohan West Jul 13 '11 at 22:25
if (object is IEnumerable)
{
    foreach(var value in (IEnumerable)object)
    {
        // ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Cast it into IEnumerable:

var list = someVariable as IEnumerable;
if (list != null)
{
    ...
}
share|improve this answer

GetEnumerator() is defined on the IEnumerable interface, so:

if (obj is IEnumerable) 
{ 
   ... 
}
share|improve this answer

Check if it implements IEnumerable. IEnumerable<T> derives from IEnumerable, so any generic collection implements IEnumerable too.

if you have a type you can use Type.IsAssignableFrom if you have an instance you can use the is/as operators.

share|improve this answer

The IEnumerable interface determines whether or not something is enumerable.

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Usually, yes. But it's not required. – Anthony Pegram Jul 13 '11 at 21:25
    
@Anthony Pegram: Out of curiosity, what are the other cases? – user610650 Jul 13 '11 at 21:28
1  
@sixfeetsix, see section 8.8.4 of the language specification if this interests you. – Anthony Pegram Jul 13 '11 at 21:36
2  
@Anthony: In practice, you typically find that objects that implement pattern-based enumerators also implement interface-based enumerators. The interface version may incur a gc pressure penalty or a boxing penalty, so it might be slightly less efficient. But it is quite rare for an object to only support pattern-based enumeration these days. – Eric Lippert Jul 13 '11 at 21:48
1  
@Michael: Correct, that is one reason. The other reason is that if you make the enumerator a mutable value type then you can avoid collection pressure. In some scenarios it is important to minimize collection pressure, even if that means doing a "worst practice" like writing a mutable value type. – Eric Lippert Jul 13 '11 at 23:09

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