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Say I have a Lucene index of Customers. Each Customer has the products they've ordered.

Let's say these two fellas represent two documents in my index:

Name: John Smith
  Product: Chicken Sandwich, Price: $10
  Product: Dodge Challenger, Price: $35000

Name: John Q. Public
  Product: Chicken Sandwich, Price: $15
  Product: Audi TT, Price: $35000

Given that my index is Customer-centric rather than order-centric, my documents would presumably look like this:

<add>
<doc>
  <field name="Name">John Smith</field>
  <field name="Product">Chicken Sandwich</field>
  <field name="Price">10</field>
  <field name="Product">Dodge Challenger</field>
  <field name="Price">35000</field>
</doc>
<doc>
  <field name="Name">John Q. Public</field>
  ...

Which would end up munging together all of the prices and products as multivalued fields and losing their relative associations.

How would I get this into my index--and how would I query it--such that a search for "Every customer that has paid more than $12 for a chicken sandwich" would return only John Q. Public?

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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It sounds like the queries you need would need to have each separate transaction as a document. So for the example you gave, the data would look like:

<add>
<doc>
  <field name="Name">John Smith</field>
  <field name="Product">Chicken Sandwich</field>
  <field name="Price">10</field>
</doc>
<doc>
  <field name="Name">John Smith</field>
  <field name="Product">Dodge Challenger</field>
  <field name="Price">35000</field>
</doc>
<doc>
  <field name="Name">John Q. Public</field>

Given the above schema, here's a possible query syntax for your example:

Product:"Chicken Sandwich" AND Price:[00000000 TO 00001200]

For further information, the Lucene documentation does a better job than I ever could!

The only fly in this ointment is the data type of the price field. In terms of writing least code, if you store it as a zero padded string (probably in cents, if I understand the American money system!), that's the most straightforward approach. However, the best performing approach (which may be important depending upon how many transactions you might have) is to use a numeric field (again, with cents). The trouble come when using the Lucene query parser: it doesn't understand this field type.

Anyway, numeric field issues definitely come under the heading of a different question.

Good luck!

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Virtually all of my querying is customer-centric. As such, converting my index to order-centric would end up giving me massively duplicated customer data. Is there is a standard way of culling out the duplicate customers? Nothing of what I've read (Filters, Collectors, Collation) seem to fit... –  Gabriel Jul 14 '11 at 14:54
    
If you aren't "store"ing the data (i.e. just using Lucene to index the data), then don't worry about it. Duplicating the data won't make much difference. It's all about the term query lookups. Try it on a sample of your data and see what the difference in index size is. I doubt you'll find it too worrying (unless you're very short of disk space). –  Adrian Conlon Jul 14 '11 at 17:01
    
I'm not worried about the speed/index size here, more curious what to do when I get duplicate customers back. For example a search for all the "John"'s in your example would return 4 records, not 2, and I'd rather not have to hand that de-duplication logic to my java project. –  Gabriel Jul 14 '11 at 23:05
    
Hmm, I see what you mean. In that case your original schema was probably correct. My query is probably correct as well (does that mean I'd get a half correct answer??). The name would contain the information you require. How were you thinking about updating the index? I guess you'd need to read the existing entry, delete the document and add it again. (Multiple values per field are OK in Lucene). –  Adrian Conlon Jul 15 '11 at 10:53
    
If a customer ordered again, you'd just update his record, with all his orders. At any rate, I suppose I need to keep digging. Thanks for the help! –  Gabriel Jul 16 '11 at 1:17
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