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I'm currently working on a project for a class to create a TextLine class that represents the a line of text that must be represented as an array of characters. I am not allowed to represent the TextLine object by using the string class indirectly or directly in any way, however, I can use it to work with the parameters.

For one of the methods, I am supposed to take in a string as an argument of a parameter, which is also a fragment to the TextLine object, and then return the index position of the first occurrence of the fragment in this TextLine, or -1, if the fragment is not found.

Right now, I'm trying to figure out the indexOf method, but my problem is that my method only checks for a starting point once. So if the letter of the TextLine object doesn't match the letter of the fragment the first time, but there is another match somewhere else in the object, the method doesn't check for that starting point.

For example, lets say I enter penplay as the TextLine, then I enter play as the fragment. Clearly, there is an occurrence of play in the TextLine, but what my indexOf method does, is that it checks the first p from penplay at index 0, then continues to see if the following letters match for the length of play, and if it doesn't, it returns -1. Any idea how I could allow the algorithm to keep searching for another starting point?

This is what I have for my code:

public int indexOf(String fragment){

char[] temp = fragment.toCharArray();

int j = 0;
for(int i = 0; i < someText.length; i++){
    while(someText[i] == temp[j]){

        for(j = 1; j < temp.length; j++){
            if(temp[j] != someText[i+j]){
                return -1;
            }
        }

        return i;

    }
}

return -1;

}
share|improve this question
    
Your own question should have clued you in: "allow the algorithm to keep searching" implies that you need another loop, as the answers are suggesting. The simplest, if not cleanest, form would be simply an if nested within a for nested within a for. –  Ryan Stewart Jul 13 '11 at 22:07
1  
The given answers all look acceptable, but you may want to spend a few minutes learning about the Boyer-Moore string search algorithm. It is fairly simple and does this sort of thing very quickly: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… –  Kevin D. Jul 13 '11 at 22:12
    
@Kevin Great link! Very interesting. –  UnknownGuardian Jul 13 '11 at 22:43
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3 Answers

You're special-casing the first character, when there's no need to. Basically you need to say:

  • For each potential starting character...
    • Does the whole of fragment match, starting at that candidate position?

So something like:

// Only deal with *viable* starting points
for (int i = 0; i < someText.length - temp.length; i++) {
    boolean found = true;
    for (int j = 0; j < temp.length && found; j++) {
        if (temp[j] != someText[i + j]) {
            found = false;
        }
    }
    if (found) {
        return i;
    }
}
return -1;

This can be refactored by extracting the inner loop:

for (int i = 0; i < someText.length - temp.length; i++) {
    if (textMatches(temp, i)) {
        return i;
    }
}
return -1;

...
// TODO: Javadoc to explain parameters :)
private boolean textMatches(char[] chars, int startingIndex) {
    for (int i = 0; i < chars.length; i++) {
        if (chars[i] != someText[i + startingIndex]) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}
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I don't quite understand this code. Could you provide comments for me please? Thanks. –  thinhtvu Jul 13 '11 at 23:45
    
@thinhtvu: I've explained it at the start of the answer. Test each potentially starting point individually - think about what it means for it to be a match from a particular starting point. –  Jon Skeet Jul 14 '11 at 1:12
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The way you have it set up seems suitable as a kind of doesStringExistAtIndex(j, fragment) function. Since that returns -1 if the string doesn't exist at the first index, you could do something like this:

//assuming that "this" is the subject that you are searching in
public int indexOf(String fragment){
  for(int i=0; i<this.length; ++i){
    if(doesStringExistAtIndex(i, fragment))
      return i;
  }
  return -1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your loop bounds are wrong - if you're trying to find "small" in "this string could be long but still have small in it" you don't want to stop looking after you've reached position 5... –  Jon Skeet Jul 13 '11 at 22:08
    
I've edited the loop bounds, with the assumption that this.length is the length of the string you're searching in (never minding the optimization of not searching for "small" once you hit length-5). –  Dylan Jul 14 '11 at 15:44
    
Right - it does mean your doesStringExistAt method needs to be careful, mind you... –  Jon Skeet Jul 14 '11 at 16:18
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Not sure if this is what you wanted, but I basically wrote up an indexOf method. I did some testing and it seemed to work just fine in some tests I did. Of course, its going to look different because I wanted to make testing easier, but it should be 30 seconds or less of converting if you decide to use it.

public int indexOf(String fragment, String source)
{
    char[] temp = fragment.toCharArray();
    char[] someText = source.toCharArray();

    outer : for(int i = 0; i <= someText.length - temp.length;i++) //stops looping because why loop after the fragment is longer than the source we have left when its impossible to find
    {
        if(someText[i] == temp[0]) //if the first characters are the same
        {
            int q = 0;
            while(q < temp.length) //loop through the fragment
            {
                if(someText[i+q] != temp[q]) //if the characters are not the same, stop, and go to the next character of the source. Don't return anything
                {
                    continue outer; //continues the loop labeled 'outer' (e.g. outer : for(...) )
                }
                q++; //increment index since they both match
            }
            return i; //fragment and some part of the source matched since it reached here. Return the index of the first character
        }
    }
    return -1; //reached here because nothing was found :( return -1
}

EDIT 0 Added line comments

share|improve this answer
    
This is basically the same as what I have except with a while loop. It does not help with my problem. Thanks for trying though! –  thinhtvu Jul 13 '11 at 23:44
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