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I'm trying to issue a GET command to my local server using netcat by doing the following:

echo -e "GET / HTTP/1.1\nHost: localhost" | nc localhost 80

Unfortunately, I get a HTTP/1.1 400 Bad Request response for this. What, at the very minimum, is required for a HTTP request?

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Not sure, it works for me (Bash, Apache, Ubuntu) after I add \n\n to the back. But I think HTTP is sensitive to the nature of line endings, so maybe double-check that. –  Kerrek SB Jul 13 '11 at 22:07
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6 Answers

up vote 18 down vote accepted

It must use CRLF line endings, and it must end in \r\n\r\n, i.e. a blank line. This is what I use:

printf 'GET / HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: www.example.com\r\nConnection: close\r\n\r\n' |
  nc www.example.com 80

Additionally, I prefer printf over echo, and I add an extra header to have the server close the connection, but those aren’t needed.

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And do remember that the newline in standard HTTP is always \r\n. –  Matti Virkkunen Jul 13 '11 at 22:07
    
Nice, for my purposes, all I needed to do was printf 'GET / HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: localhost 80\r\n\r\n' | nc localhost 80. Thanks! –  Naftuli Tzvi Kay Jul 13 '11 at 22:10
    
Host should be just localhost not localhost 80 –  slebetman Oct 4 '13 at 1:34
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if the request is: "GET / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n" then the response contains header as well as body, and the connection closes after the response.

if the request is:"GET / HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: host:port\r\nConnection: close\r\n\r\n" then the response contains header as well as body, and the connection closes after the response.

if the request is:"GET / HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: host:port\r\n\r\n" then the response contains header as well as body, and the connection will not close even after the response.

if your request is: "GET /\r\n\r\n" then the response contains no header and only body, and the connection closes after the response.

if your request is: "HEAD / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n" then the response contains only header and no body, and the connection closes after the response.

if the request is: "HEAD / HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: host:port\r\nConnection: close\r\n\r\n" then the response contains only header and no body, and the connection closes after the response.

if the request is: "HEAD / HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: host:port\r\n\r\n" then the response contains only header and no body, and the connection will not close after the response.

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The fact of the 400 Bad Request error itself does not imply that your request violates HTTP. The server very well could be giving this response for another reason.

As far as I know the absolute minimum valid HTTP request is:

GET / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n
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2  
Actually, the absolute minimum is "GET /\r\n". If no version is specified, the server is supposed to assume HTTP/0.9. In HTTP/0.9, request headers aren't allowed, so you don't need the blank line to terminate them. I wouldn't expect this to be supported everywhere, however, as HTTP/0.9 clients are very rare in reality, so servers may well not be tested with them. –  Jules May 20 '12 at 10:41
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HTTP/1.0 accepts no headers, HTTP/1.1 has a mandatory header: Host. –  droope Nov 11 '13 at 0:59
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See Wiki: HTTP Client Request (Example).

Note the following:

A client request (consisting in this case of the request line and only one header) is followed by a blank line, so that the request ends with a double newline, each in the form of a carriage return followed by a line feed. The "Host" header distinguishes between various DNS names sharing a single IP address, allowing name-based virtual hosting. While optional in HTTP/1.0, it is mandatory in HTTP/1.1.

The absolute minimum (if removing the Host is allowed ;-) is then GET / HTTP/1.0\r\n\r\n.

Happy coding

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I was able to get a response from my Apache server with only the requested document, no response header, with just

GET /\r\n

If you want response headers, including the status code, you need one of the other answers here though.

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Interesting. This uses the original HTTP/0.9 protocol from the early 90s. I'm very impressed Apache still responds to it. –  Ben Russell May 10 '13 at 13:37
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You should add an empty line: \r\n\r\n

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertext_Transfer_Protocol#Client_request

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