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I am developing a program in which i need to know the values of IP header fields inside my program.Since the IP header is of 20 bytes:

struct ipheader {

     unsigned char ip_hl:4, ip_v:4; /* this means that each member is 4 bits */
     unsigned char ip_tos;
     unsigned short int ip_len;
     unsigned short int ip_id;
     unsigned short int ip_off;
     unsigned char ip_ttl;
     unsigned char ip_p;
     unsigned short int ip_sum;
     unsigned int ip_src;
     unsigned int ip_dst;
    }; 

Is there any way that i can know the values of these fields inside my C program?

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Are you wondering how to parse the fields from an already available packet, or how to capture the packet including headers in the first place? –  Karl Bielefeldt Jul 14 '11 at 6:02
1  
I suggest to have a look at libpcap - it should make your life a lot easier. –  Sander De Dycker Jul 14 '11 at 6:20
    
the query is that how can i get these system values,since while creating a simple datagram packet (UDP) i fill the SrcIP and port ,DEst IP adress and port and send the packet ,rest of the value are picked by default form the system stack.so i want to know the value of the rest fields eg: ttl,tos etc –  sumant Jul 14 '11 at 8:45

2 Answers 2

Some of those values can be set/retrieved via setsockopt()/getsockopt() calls at the SOL_IP/IPPROTO/IP level. Consult your OS' documentation (e.g: on Linux man 7 ip).

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Provided your compiler doesn't introduce any alignment blocks within that structure (make sure that CHAR_BIT is 8 and sizeof(struct ipheader) is 20), you should just be able to include it in your code as-is, and then add something like:

struct ipheader *iph = (struct ipheader *)blk;
printf ("TTL = %d\n", iph->ip_ttl);

In that code, you will have an IP header pointed to by blk, which is probably a char*. Casting it to the correct pointer type will allow you to easily access the fields.

The following complete program shows this in action:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <limits.h>

struct ipheader {
    /* 0 */ unsigned char ip_hl:4, ip_v:4;
    /* 1 */ unsigned char ip_tos;
    /* 2 */ unsigned short int ip_len;
    /* 3 */ unsigned short int ip_id;
    /* 4 */ unsigned short int ip_off;
    /* 5 */ unsigned char ip_ttl;
    /* 6 */ unsigned char ip_p;
    /* 7 */ unsigned short int ip_sum;
    /* 8 */ unsigned int ip_src;
    /* 9 */ unsigned int ip_dst;
};

int main (void) {
    char blk[] = {
        '\x00','\x11','\x22','\x22','\x33','\x33','\x44','\x44',
        '\x55','\x66','\x77','\x77','\x88','\x88','\x88','\x88',
        '\x99','\x99','\x99','\x99'
    };
    struct ipheader *iph = (struct ipheader *)(&blk);

    printf ("TTL = %x\n", iph->ip_ttl);
    printf ("sum = %x\n", iph->ip_sum);
    printf ("dst = %x\n", iph->ip_dst);

    return 0;
}

Output is, as expected:

TTL = 55
sum = 7777
dst = 99999999
share|improve this answer
    
basically the structure i provided was for reference, the real query is that how can i get these system values,since while creating a simple datagram packet (UDP) i fill the SrcIP and port ,DEst IP adress and port and send the packet ,rest of the value are picked by default form the system stack.the rest values include ip_ttl,ip_tos etc –  sumant Jul 14 '11 at 6:25

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