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Following is the input set given.

1009 2000
1009 2001
1002 2002
1003 2002 

Each line represents one group, Number represents ID of the member in the group. Problem is to choose minimum number of people which re-presents complete given set. Only one member should be choose from each Group. 2-tuple members will not repeated. But members can be part of more than one group.

So in this example answer be 1009 and 2002 which represents the sets. 1009 is chosen because it is representing two team and same is the case for 2002.

I am looking for what algorithm can be used to solve this problem.

Another example:

1009 2000
1009 2001
1002 2002
1003 2002 
1004 2003

Answer can be { 1009 , 2002, 1004} or { 1009, 2002, 2003}

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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Actually, the example given by Sodved shows, that I was wrong. It is not solved by the edge cover, as that still leaves the problem of selecting the actual vertices.

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Isn't it actually minimum the vertex problem? As he wants the smallest set of IDs? en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vertex_cover I knocked up a "try every combo" solution of this in perl, and it took a long time with a around 16 points –  Sodved Jul 14 '11 at 7:45
    
No it is not the minimum vertex problem (which is btw, NP-complete). The requirement, that only one member of each group must be chosen conflicts with the vertex cover situation, in which you don't care about choosing vertices that are connected by an edge. –  Frank Jul 14 '11 at 7:57
    
Actually ignore me. It is more of an edg problem, even though the final result is vertices. Am I right in thinking this pic displays what he's after? i.min.us/icnaFo.png –  Sodved Jul 14 '11 at 7:59
    
You're right, and indeed your example shows that the edge cover isn't enough, as it would give you 3 edges, but it's not directly implying the two vertices. –  Frank Jul 14 '11 at 8:06
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You left some details out, so I'm making the following assumptions. Let me know if they're wrong.

  • There are exactly two numbers per line
  • No number that appears first on some line also appears second on some other line

So if you think of each number as a vertex in a graph, and each line of input as an edge between two vertices, what you've got is a bipartite graph--a set of "first numbers" and a set of "second numbers," and edges between them. Now, break up the graph into each of its connected components. In each connected component, you either have to pick all the "first numbers" or all the "second numbers." So for each connected component, pick whichever of those two options is a smaller set.

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If anyone's intersted, here's some clumsy inefficent perl code which seems to solev the problem. Takes a LONG... time with a large data set. I'm sure things could be done better, especially he generation of the index permutations (sequences).

#!/usr/bin/perl
# http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6689147/

use strict;
use warnings;

# Return array of arrays with every possible sequence of 0..n-1
sub sequences($);
sub sequences($)
{
    my $n = $_[0];
    my @ret;
    if( $n > 0 )
    {
        for( my $i=0; $i<$n; $i++ )
        {
            my @a = sequences( $n-1 );
            foreach my $br (@a)
            {
                my @b = @$br;
                splice( @b, $i, 0, $n-1 );
                push( @ret, \@b );
            }
        }
    }
    else
    {
        @ret = ( [] );
    }
    return @ret;
} # END sequences

# Remove elements from set which are covered by later elements in set
sub stripset($$)
{
    my( $data, $set ) = @_;
    my $strip = 0;
    my %cover;
    for( my $i=0; $i<scalar(@$set); $i++ )
    {
        my $covered;
        for( my $j=scalar(@$set)-1; $j>$i; $j-- )
        {
            if( $data->{$set->[$j]}->{$set->[$i]}
            &&  !$cover{$set->[$i]} )
            {
                $covered = 1;
                $cover{$set->[$j]} = 1;
                last;
            }
        }
        if( $covered )
        {
            $strip = $i+1;
        }
        else
        {
            last;
        }
    }
    if( $strip )
    {
        splice( @$set, 0, $strip );
    }
} # END stripset

# Load input
my %links;
while( my $line = <STDIN> )
{
    if( $line =~ /^\s*(\S+)\s+(\S+)\s*$/ )
    {
        $links{$1}->{$2} = 1;
        $links{$2}->{$1} = 1;
    }
    else
    {
        warn "INVALID INPUT LINE: $line";
    }
}

my @elems = keys(%links);
my @minset = @elems;
foreach my $seq ( sequences( scalar(@elems) ) )
{
    my @set = map( $elems[$_], @$seq );
#print "TEST set: " . join( ' ', @set ) . "\n";
    stripset( \%links, \@set );
#print "STRP set: " . join( ' ', @set ) . "\n";
    if( scalar(@set) < scalar(@minset) )
    {
        @minset = @set;
    }
}
print "Shortest set: " . join( ' ', @minset ) . "\n";
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Just want to notice that this requirement

Only one member should be choose from each Group.

doesn't make much sense. If you enforce it, this simple problem

1 2
2 3
3 1

has no solutions.

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Choose 1 from group 1, 3 from Group 2 and 3. –  Avinash Jul 14 '11 at 8:57
    
2 and 3 are in the same group. –  n.m. Jul 14 '11 at 9:12
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