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below is the sample source i want to use on " Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.5 (Tikanga) Kernel 2.6.18-194.el5xen x86_64" OS machine.

The general idea is i want to have backtrace of other thread. so i am raising a Signal SIGUSR1 for that thread and respective handler does backtrace() call. in my scenario as below, FrameTwo function does malloc and free in the loop. when ever the signal is raised for this particular thread, free/malloc is on the callstack and when Signal handler calls backtrace, program crash.

(gdb) where (stack from gdb)

0 0x0000003e67207638 in ?? ()

1 0x0000003e672088bb in _Unwind_Backtrace

2 0x00000037ba0e5fa8 in backtrace ()

3 0x000000000040071a in handler ()

4

5 0x00000037ba071fac in _int_free ()

6 0x0000000a33605000 in ?? ()

7 0x000000004123b130 in ?? ()

8 0x00000000004007d4 in ThreadFunction ()

9 0x000000001f039020 in ?? ()

10 0x000000004123b940 in ?? ()

11 0x0000000000000001 in ?? ()

12 0x0000000000000000 in ?? ()

I learn from other sources that backtrace shouldn't be called from Signal handler, so i have written my own function grok_and_print_thread_stack() for same. it just uses RBP register to navigate stack(RBP of current frame points to the previous frames RBP). but this algorithm does not work in this case too and when _int_free () is there on the callstack, the RBP register navigation algorithm breaks. RBP of _int_free is like 0x20 likewise..

Anyone knows how Callstack can be navigated from the registers? or how can i use backtrace for my purpose?

*#include "stdio.h"

*#include "stdlib.h"

*#include "pthread.h"

*#include "signal.h"

*#include "syscall.h"

*#include "string.h"

*#include "inttypes.h"

//####################################################################

//gcc BacktraceTestProgram.c -o backtracetest -lpthread //./backtracetest //gdb -c core backtracetest

//#################################################################### volatile sig_atomic_t flag = 1; int thlist[6] = {0}; int cnt = 0; int *memory = NULL;

//####################################################################

void raiseUserSignal(int tid) {

    union sigval value;
    value.sival_int = 1;
    sigqueue(tid,SIGUSR1, value);               

}

//####################################################################

int grok_and_print_thread_stack() {

int ret = 0;
register uint64_t* rbp asm("rbp");
/*if buffer was built before, add separator */
uint64_t *previous_bp;

/*save pointers*/
previous_bp = rbp;

/*  stack Traversal */
while(previous_bp) 
{       
    uint64_t *next_bp;

    next_bp = (uint64_t*)*previous_bp;
    printf("Read BP: %lx \n", next_bp);         

    if ( NULL == (void*)next_bp )
    {
        printf("Reached the top of the stack\n");   
        fflush(stdout); 
        break;
    }

    previous_bp = next_bp;
}
return ret;

}

//####################################################################

void handler(int signum, siginfo_t *info, void *context) {

int nptrs =0 ;      
void *buffer[100]={NULL};
char **strings = NULL;

nptrs = backtrace(buffer, 100);

flag = 1;

}

//####################################################################

void FrameTwo(const char A) {

do{     
    if( memory == NULL)
        memory = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int) *5);

    if(memory != NULL)  {
        free(memory); 
        memory = NULL;
    }
}while(1);

}

//####################################################################

void FrameOne(int no) {

FrameTwo('A');

}

//####################################################################

void *ThreadFunction( void *ptr ) {

int tid = syscall(SYS_gettid);
thlist[cnt++] = tid;

FrameOne(10);           

}

//####################################################################

void RegisterSignalHandler() {

/*  Register a Signal    Handler     */
struct sigaction usrsig_action;
usrsig_action.sa_flags=SA_SIGINFO;
usrsig_action.sa_sigaction = &handler;
sigaction (SIGUSR1, &usrsig_action, NULL);

}

//####################################################################

int main(int no , char *argc[] ) {

int  iret1;
pthread_t thread1;
RegisterSignalHandler();

/* Create independent threads each of which will execute function */
iret1 = pthread_create( &thread1, NULL, ThreadFunction, NULL);

while(cnt == 0);

while(1 )   {
    if(flag == 1){
        flag = 0;
        raiseUserSignal(thlist[0]);
    }
}

pthread_join( thread1, NULL);
return 0;

} //####################################################################

share|improve this question
    
IIRC the signal handler has its own stack, so you wouldn't see the main stack of your program but that of your signal handler. –  DarkDust Jul 14 '11 at 6:21
    
@DarkDust i am able to see main stack as well in most of the scenarios.. in fact in general while crash analysis people Suggest to implement the Signal handler for crash and call backtrace() from that handler to see main stack.. –  sandeep Jul 14 '11 at 7:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In general x86_64 programs are likely to have been built with -fomit-frame-pointer as it is the default when optimisation is on.

What that means is that RBP is not usable for unwinding the stack and you will either need to use the DWARF unwind information (if you have debugging information available) or the exception unwind table.

share|improve this answer
    
in most of the scenarios this algorithm with RBP(Frame Pointer register in callstack) works and fails in very few scenarios like free and malloc... if i remove free and malloc from my stack.. this implementation works.. is "exception unwind table" available during execution or at the time of crash only? How can i use DWARF unwind information ? any reference? –  sandeep Jul 14 '11 at 6:56
    
Your code may have been built with frame pointers, but the system library routines (like malloc and free) won't have been. So backtracing with RBP will work in your code but not when you are tracing out of the C libary. –  TomH Jul 14 '11 at 7:37

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