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I was looking for a tree or graph data structure in C# but I guess there isn't one provided. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms379574.aspx explains a bit about why. Is there a convenient library which is commonly used to provide this functionality? Perhaps through a strategy pattern to solve the issues presented in the article.

I feel a bit silly implementing my own tree, just as I would implementing my own ArrayList.

Edit:

I think I need to explain better what I'm looking for. I just want a generic tree which can be unbalanced. Think of a directory tree. C5 looks nifty, but their tree structures seem to be implemented as balanced red-black trees better suited to search than representing a hierarchy of nodes.

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1  
Bit more extreme trees: stackoverflow.com/questions/196294/… ;-) –  Tuomas Hietanen Jul 20 '12 at 17:14

14 Answers 14

up vote 83 down vote accepted

My best advice would be that there is no standard tree data structure because there are so many ways you could implement it that it would be impossible to cover all bases with one solution. The more specific a solution, the less likely it is applicable to any given problem. I even get annoyed with LinkedList - what if I want a circular linked list?

The basic structure you'll need to implement will be a collection of nodes, and here are some options to get you started. Let's assume that the class Node is the base class of the entire solution.

If you need to only navigate down the tree, then a Node class needs a List of children.

If you need to navigate up the tree, then the Node class needs a link to its parent node.

Build an AddChild method that takes care of all the minutia of these two points and any other business logic that must be implemented (child limits, sorting the children, etc.)

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2  
personally i wouldn't mind some sort of self-balancing binary tree to be added to the library as this is some extra work than just using an adjaceny list. –  jk. Jan 6 '10 at 13:00
3  
@jk I believe that SortedDictionary and SortedSet are built atop red/black trees, so using these should work. –  jonp Sep 24 '10 at 13:41
    
Take a look at composite pattern ;-) Exactly what you're looking for –  Nicolas Voron Oct 12 '12 at 9:35

I hate to admit it but I ended up writing my own tree class using a linked list. On an unrelated note I just discovered this round thing which, when attached to a thing I'm calling an 'axle' allows for easier transportation of goods.

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delegate void TreeVisitor<T>(T nodeData);

    class NTree<T>
    {
        T data;
        LinkedList<NTree<T>> children;

        public NTree(T data)
        {
            this.data = data;
            children = new LinkedList<NTree<T>>();
        }

        public void addChild(T data)
        {
            children.AddFirst(new NTree<T>(data));
        }

        public NTree<T> getChild(int i)
        {
            foreach (NTree<T> n in children)
                if (--i == 0) return n;
            return null;
        }

        public void traverse(NTree<T> node, TreeVisitor<T> visitor)
        {
            visitor(node.data);
            foreach (NTree<T> kid in node.children)
                traverse(kid, visitor);
        }        
    }

Simple recursive implementation... < 40 lines of code... You just need to keep a reference to the root of the tree outside of the class, or wrap it in another class, maybe rename to TreeNode??

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2  
+1 this is a good implementation. –  chikak Jan 22 '10 at 8:27
6  
In this case, in C# anyway, you could avoid writing your own delegate and use the pre-made Action<T> delegate: public void traverse(NTree<T> node, Action<T> visitor) . Action<>'s signature is: void Action<T>( T obj ) . There are also versions from 0 to 4 different parameters. There's also an analogous delegate for functions called Func<>. –  Benny Jobigan Feb 6 '10 at 23:45
1  
how would i call this delegate? –  Freakishly Jan 17 '11 at 0:54
3  
changing the traverse method to be static or possibly wrapping it to hide the recursive nature would be a good idea, but it is simple to traverse: create a method with the signature of delegate ie for a tree of ints: void my_visitor_impl(int datum) - make it static if you need, instantiate a delgate: TreeVisitor<int> my_visitor = my_visitor_impl; and then invoke on the root node or NTree class if u make it static: NTree<int>.traverse(my_tree, my_visitor) –  Aaron Gage Jan 17 '11 at 7:01
5  
Making addChild() return the NTree that it added would make it nicer for adding data to a tree. (Unless I'm missing a cunning way to build a tree with this, without relying on the implementation detail that a newly added child == getChild(1)?) –  Rory Aug 16 '11 at 23:40

The generally excellent C5 Generic Collection Library has several different tree-based data structures, including sets, bags and dictionaries. Source code is available if you want to study their implementation details. (I have used C5 collections in production code with good results, although I haven't used any of the tree structures specifically.)

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5  
Don't know if maybe things have changed but right now the book is freely available to download as PDF from the C5 site. –  Oskar Aug 6 '09 at 12:10
4  
Lack of documentation is no more a concern as there's a 272 pages long pdf complementing the library... Can't comment on code quality, but judging from the doc quality, I'm really looking forward to digging into this tonight! –  Florian Doyon Jan 25 '10 at 16:00
    
From what I understand, this C5 library doesn't have trees at all, but only some tree-derived data structures. –  roim Aug 20 at 12:38

Here's mine, which is very similar to Aaron Gage's, just a little more conventional, in my opinion. For my purposes, I haven't ran into any performance issues with List<T>. It would be easy enough to switch to a LinkedList if needed.


namespace Overby.Collections
{
    public class TreeNode<T>
    {
        private readonly T _value;
        private readonly List<TreeNode<T>> _children = new List<TreeNode<T>>();

        public TreeNode(T value)
        {
            _value = value;
        }

        public TreeNode<T> this[int i]
        {
            get { return _children[i]; }
        }

        public TreeNode<T> Parent { get; private set; }

        public T Value { get { return _value; } }

        public ReadOnlyCollection<TreeNode<T>> Children
        {
            get { return _children.AsReadOnly(); }
        }

        public TreeNode<T> AddChild(T value)
        {
            var node = new TreeNode<T>(value) {Parent = this};
            _children.Add(node);
            return node;
        }

        public TreeNode<T>[] AddChildren(params T[] values)
        {
            return values.Select(AddChild).ToArray();
        }

        public bool RemoveChild(TreeNode<T> node)
        {
            return _children.Remove(node);
        }

        public void Traverse(Action<T> action)
        {
            action(Value);
            foreach (var child in _children)
                child.Traverse(action);
        }

        public IEnumerable<T> Flatten()
        {
            return new[] {Value}.Union(_children.SelectMany(x => x.Flatten()));
        }
    }
}
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why is your Value property exposed when you're setting it in the constructor? that leaves it open for manipulation AFTER you've already set it via constructor right? Should be private set? –  CoffeeAddict Mar 29 '13 at 20:47
    
Sure, why not make it immutable? Edited. –  Ronnie Overby Mar 30 '13 at 4:44
    
Thanks! I quite liked not having to write my own. (Still can't believe it isn't a thing that exists natively. I always thought .net, or at least .net 4.0, had everything.) –  neminem May 14 '13 at 17:40

Yet another tree structure:

public class TreeNode<T> : IEnumerable<TreeNode<T>>
{

    public T Data { get; set; }
    public TreeNode<T> Parent { get; set; }
    public ICollection<TreeNode<T>> Children { get; set; }

    public TreeNode(T data)
    {
        this.Data = data;
        this.Children = new LinkedList<TreeNode<T>>();
    }

    public TreeNode<T> AddChild(T child)
    {
        TreeNode<T> childNode = new TreeNode<T>(child) { Parent = this };
        this.Children.Add(childNode);
        return childNode;
    }

    // other features ...
}

Sample usage:

TreeNode<string> root = new TreeNode<string>("root");
{
    TreeNode<string> node0 = root.AddChild("node0");
    TreeNode<string> node1 = root.AddChild("node1");
    TreeNode<string> node2 = root.AddChild("node2");
    {
        TreeNode<string> node20 = node2.AddChild(null);
        TreeNode<string> node21 = node2.AddChild("node21");
        {
            TreeNode<string> node210 = node21.AddChild("node210");
            TreeNode<string> node211 = node21.AddChild("node211");
        }
    }
    TreeNode<string> node3 = root.AddChild("node3");
    {
        TreeNode<string> node30 = node3.AddChild("node30");
    }
}

BONUS
See fully-fledged tree with:

  • iterator
  • searching
  • Java/C#

https://code.google.com/p/yet-another-tree-structure/

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1  
-1?? This tree works perfect & is GOOD :] –  Grzegorz Dev Sep 14 '13 at 12:16

See http://quickgraph.codeplex.com/

QuickGraph provides generic directed/undirected graph datastructures and algorithms for .Net 2.0 and up. QuickGraph comes with algorithms such as depth first seach, breath first search, A* search, shortest path, k-shortest path, maximum flow, minimum spanning tree, least common ancestors, etc... QuickGraph supports MSAGL, GLEE, and Graphviz to render the graphs, serialization to GraphML, etc...

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If you would like to write your own, you can start with this six-part document detailing effective usage of C# 2.0 data structures and how to go about analyzing your implementation of data structures in C#. Each article has examples and an installer with samples you can follow along with.

“An Extensive Examination of Data Structures Using C# 2.0” by Scott Mitchell

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I have a little extension to the solutions.

Using a recursive generic declaration and a deriving subclass you can better concentrate on your actual target.

Notice, it's different from a non generic implementation, you don`t need to cast 'node' in 'NodeWorker'.

Here's my example:

public class GenericTree<T> where T : GenericTree<T> // recursive constraint  
{
  // no specific data declaration  

  protected List<T> children;

  public GenericTree()
  {
    this.children = new List<T>();
  }

  public virtual void AddChild(T newChild)
  {
    this.children.Add(newChild);
  }

  public void Traverse(Action<int, T> visitor)
  {
    this.traverse(0, visitor);
  }

  protected virtual void traverse(int depth, Action<int, T> visitor)
  {
    visitor(depth, (T)this);
    foreach (T child in this.children)
      child.traverse(depth + 1, visitor);
  }
}

public class GenericTreeNext : GenericTree<GenericTreeNext> // concrete derivation
{
  public string Name {get; set;} // user-data example

  public GenericTreeNext(string name)
  {
    this.Name = name;
  }
}

static void Main(string[] args)  
{  
  GenericTreeNext tree = new GenericTreeNext("Main-Harry");  
  tree.AddChild(new GenericTreeNext("Main-Sub-Willy"));  
  GenericTreeNext inter = new GenericTreeNext("Main-Inter-Willy");  
  inter.AddChild(new GenericTreeNext("Inter-Sub-Tom"));  
  inter.AddChild(new GenericTreeNext("Inter-Sub-Magda"));  
  tree.AddChild(inter);  
  tree.AddChild(new GenericTreeNext("Main-Sub-Chantal"));  
  tree.Traverse(NodeWorker);  
}  

static void NodeWorker(int depth, GenericTreeNext node)  
{                                // a little one-line string-concatenation (n-times)
  Console.WriteLine("{0}{1}: {2}", String.Join("   ", new string[depth + 1]), depth, node.Name);  
}  
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what is depth and where and how do you get it from? –  CoffeeAddict Mar 29 '13 at 4:49

Try this simple sample.

public class TreeNode<TValue>
{
    #region Properties
    public TValue Value { get; set; }
    public List<TreeNode<TValue>> Children { get; private set; }
    public bool HasChild { get { return Children.Any(); } }
    #endregion
    #region Constructor
    public TreeNode()
    {
        this.Children = new List<TreeNode<TValue>>();
    }
    public TreeNode(TValue value)
        : this()
    {
        this.Value = value;
    }
    #endregion
    #region Methods
    public void AddChild(TreeNode<TValue> treeNode)
    {
        Children.Add(treeNode);
    }
    public void AddChild(TValue value)
    {
        var treeNode = new TreeNode<TValue>(value);
        AddChild(treeNode);
    }
    #endregion
}
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I create a Node class that could be helpfull for other people. The class has properties like:

  • Children
  • Ancestors
  • Descendants
  • Siblings
  • Level of the node
  • Parent
  • Root
  • Etc.

There is also the possibility to convert a flat list of items with an Id and a ParentId to a tree. The nodes holds a reference to both the children and the parent, so that makes iterating nodes quite fast.

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Is there some reason one cannot include a TreeView in the project and use it? There is no reason to actually show it to a user. Of course there are several form of projects when this is not an option.

One can always create new classes that inherit from example TreeNode if special complexity is needed?

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1  
I would consider it to be a bad idea to import an entire UI library for a very simple tree. –  stimms Oct 3 '12 at 19:22
    
Could you motivate? Its not like actual harddrive space requirement is an issue anymore? Clumsy? As I mentioned before, I can understand that this is not a solution for an specialised software or something without an existing user interface. I am a lazy programmer, if I can get a structure for free its all good. And an existing library does have a lot for free, one can find a lot of code from people that used it for a lot of things. –  Simply G. Oct 4 '12 at 10:49
    
I am not arguing, I just want to know your reasoning. –  Simply G. Oct 4 '12 at 10:56

Here is my implementation of BST

class BST
{
    public class Node
    {
        public Node Left { get; set; }
        public object Data { get; set; }
        public Node Right { get; set; }

        public Node()
        {
            Data = null;
        }

        public Node(int Data)
        {
            this.Data = (object)Data;
        }

        public void Insert(int Data)
        {
            if (this.Data == null)
            {
                this.Data = (object)Data;
                return;
            }
            if (Data > (int)this.Data)
            {
                if (this.Right == null)
                {
                    this.Right = new Node(Data);
                }
                else
                {
                    this.Right.Insert(Data);
                }
            }
            if (Data <= (int)this.Data)
            {
                if (this.Left == null)
                {
                    this.Left = new Node(Data);
                }
                else
                {
                    this.Left.Insert(Data);
                }
            }
        }

        public void TraverseInOrder()
        {
            if(this.Left != null)
                this.Left.TraverseInOrder();
            Console.Write("{0} ", this.Data);
            if (this.Right != null)
                this.Right.TraverseInOrder();
        }
    }

    public Node Root { get; set; }
    public BST()
    {
        Root = new Node();
    }
}
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In case you need a rooted tree data structure implementation that uses less memory, you can write your Node class as follows (C++ implementation):

class Node {
       Node* parent;
       int item; // depending on your needs

       Node* firstChild; //pointer to left most child of node
       Node* nextSibling; //pointer to the sibling to the right
}
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10  
Posting C++ code on a question specifically for C# is not the best idea, Jake. Especially one that includes pointers. You do know that pointers are being hunted down mercilessly in C#, right? :p –  ThunderGr Oct 16 '13 at 11:40
    
@ThunderGr that is not fair. Answering in C# would have been better, but those C++ pointers can be understood by C#-speakers as references (they're less safe, ok). After David Boike, Aaron Gage, Ronnie Overby, Grzegorz Dev, Berezh and Erik Nagel all having sugested basically the same data structure with minor differences only in expression, Jake sugested breaking down the linked list yielding a simpler structures with only one type of node and sibling navigability. Don't express your dislike of C++ by down-voting a constructive answer. –  migle May 20 at 9:35
1  
@migle I did not downvote the answer(did not upvote either). And I do not dislike C++. I saw that the answer was downvoted without anyone suggesting anything to Jake about why and how he would improve his answer. It is not about "being better". The question is tagged for C# only. Posting answers in another language than the tag is not recommended and some people will downvote. –  ThunderGr May 20 at 10:02

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