Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this query in T-SQL 2008:

SELECT a.Amount / (
    SELECT SUM(b.Amount) FROM Revenue b 
    WHERE YEAR(b.RevenueDate) = YEAR(a.ExpenseDate)
    AND MONTH(b.RevenueDate) = MONTH(a.ExpenseDate)
    AND b.HotelKey = a.HotelKey
)
FROM Expense a

The problem is it takes too long to finish the query. I think it's caused by the subquery "SELECT SUM(b.Amount) FROM Revenue b..." which is executed for each row in table Expense.

How to optimize that kind of query? Is there any better alternative for the query?

EDIT: I'm sorry I forget the "AND b.HotelKey = a.HotelKey" clause in the subquery. The above original query has been updated.

@damien:

Here is your query added with HotelKey join:

SELECT
    a.Amount / b.Amount
FROM
    Expense a
    inner join
    (SELECT
        HotelKey,
        DATEADD(month,DATEDIFF(month,0,RevenueDate),0) as MonthStart,
        DATEADD(month,1+DATEDIFF(month,0,RevenueDate),0) as MonthEnd,
        SUM(Amount) as Amount
     FROM
        Revenue
     GROUP BY
        HotelKey,
        DATEADD(month,DATEDIFF(month,0,RevenueDate),0),
        DATEADD(month,1+DATEDIFF(month,0,RevenueDate),0)
    ) b 
    ON
        a.ExpenseDate >= b.MonthStart and
        a.ExpenseDate < b.MonthEnd 
        and a.HotelKey = b.HotelKey
share|improve this question
    
Is there an additional outer WHERE clause, and/or does this query end up using all rows from Revenue? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 14 '11 at 7:11
    
"additional outer WHERE?" No. "does this query end up using all rows from Revenue?" Maybe yes, maybe no, it depends on if both Expense and Revenue have same RevenueDate's year-month or not. –  suud Jul 14 '11 at 10:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try to change the where clause in your inner query to this:

where b.RevenueDate >= dateadd(month, datediff(month, 0, a.ExpenseDate), 0) and
      b.RevenueDate < dateadd(month, 1+datediff(month, 0, a.ExpenseDate), 0)

It will give the query a chance to use an index on Revenue.RevenueDate if you have one.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried the query but I got syntax error. On this line: "b.RevenueDate >= datediff(month, 0, a.ExpenseDate), 0)", I think it lacks an opening bracket. –  suud Jul 14 '11 at 10:47
    
@suud - It was lacking a dateadd. I have updated the answer. –  Mikael Eriksson Jul 14 '11 at 11:34
    
hi mikael, so far your solution is the best. The query is not complex, it's quite fast, and no missing result rows. Thanks very much. –  suud Jul 16 '11 at 18:35

If you're using a lot of the rows in Revenue to satisfy this query, you might do better to do a single subquery that computes all of the totals. (Also, using Mikael's suggestion for allowing some indexing to occur):

SELECT
    a.Amount / b.Amount
FROM
    Expense a
        inner join
    (SELECT
         DATEADD(month,DATEDIFF(month,0,RevenueDate),0) as MonthStart,
         DATEADD(month,1+DATEDIFF(month,0,RevenueDate),0) as MonthEnd
         SUM(Amount) as Amount
     FROM
         Revenue
     GROUP BY
         DATEADD(month,DATEDIFF(month,0,RevenueDate),0),
         DATEADD(month,1+DATEDIFF(month,0,RevenueDate),0)
    ) b 
         ON
              a.ExpenseDate >= b.MonthStart and
              a.ExpenseDate < b.MonthEnd
share|improve this answer
    
Would this be more performant, by reducing the load on the GROUP BY operation? - Only have MonthStart in the inline view, then have x > MonthStart AND x <= DATEADD(month, 1, MonthStart)? [Or even just removing the second GROUP BY operand, and replacing the month end calculation with DATEADD(month, 1, <MonthStart Calc>)?] –  MatBailie Jul 14 '11 at 8:30
    
@Dems - I'd expect any performance difference to be minimal - we know that every MonthStart value will only have one corresponding MonthEnd value - so whilst the key size for the grouping is doubled, it's still a relatively small key, and the number of groups is the same either way. But as with all things performance wise, the only way to be sure would be to measure them with realistic data, any additional columns not mentioned in simplifying the query, etc. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 14 '11 at 8:41
    
hi damien, your query is very fast, but I forget there is HotelKey join (please look at the first post). If I include the HotelKey join, the row results are lesser than the original query, I don't know what's the cause (I had posted the HotelKey joined query in the first post). –  suud Jul 14 '11 at 11:35

You don't specify how big the tables are. But you can get the query to be faster by creating a computed column (and indexing it) from year-month combination in table Revenue and in table Expense as well (if that table is not very small). So these computed columns (and the indexes) would be used in the query for joining the two tables.

See: Computed Columns

and: Creating Indexes on Computed Columns

share|improve this answer
    
Expense table has 52188 records, while the Revenue table has 215093 records. Thanks for the tips. Did you mean I have to create another computed column to hold the year-month combination with a formula like: "(CONVERT([varchar],datepart(year,[trx_date]),(0))+CONVERT([varchar],datepart(mo‌​nth,[trx_date]),0))" ? Should I set IsPersisted to "Yes"? –  suud Jul 14 '11 at 10:38
    
Yes, Persisted columns. –  ypercube Jul 14 '11 at 10:43
    
And you then GROUP BY and JOIN using these computed columns. –  ypercube Jul 14 '11 at 10:44
    
Thanks, your solution seems very viable. But in my case, I'm prohibited to change the table structure. –  suud Jul 14 '11 at 11:59
    
@suud: If you can't make any changes at ll, try Miakel's answer which seems to be using an index on Revenue.RevenueDate (I suppose you have an index there or you can add one.) To be honest, I'd try (and time and also compare execution plans of) all answers. –  ypercube Jul 14 '11 at 19:08

You could try calculating the two sums first ant then joining the two together afterwards.

SELECT a.ExpenseAmount / b.RevenueAmount

FROM
(
    SELECT SUM(Expense.Amount) As ExpenseAmount,
    YEAR(Expense.ExpenseDate) AS ExpenseYear, 
    MONTH(Expense.ExpenseDate) AS ExpenseMonth
    GROUP BY 
    YEAR(Expense.RevenueDate), 
    MONTH(Expense.RevenueDate)
) AS a INNER JOIN 
(
    SELECT SUM(Revenue.Amount) AS RevenueAmount,
    YEAR(Revenue.RevenueDate) AS RevenueYear, 
    MONTH(Revenue.RevenueDate) AS RevenueMonth
    FROM Revenue
    GROUP BY YEAR(Revenue.RevenueDate), MONTH(Revenue.RevenueDate)
) as b ON a.ExpenseYear = b.RevenueYear AND a.ExpenseMonth = b.ExpenseMonth
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.