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I'm currently working on a custom UIControl Subclass. To track the touches I use the following Method:

- (BOOL)beginTrackingWithTouch:(UITouch *)touch withEvent:(UIEvent *)event {
 NSLog(@"Start");
 CGPoint location = [touch locationInView:self];
 if ([self touchIsInside:location] == YES) {
    //Touch Down
    [self sendActionsForControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchDown];
    return YES;
 }
 else {
    return NO;
 }  
}

This works as expected and @"Start" is loged exactely once. The next step is that I add a Target and a Selector with UIControlEventTouchDown.

[markItem addTarget:self action:@selector(action:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];

This works also and the action: method is called. But that's my problem. The action is called twice. What am I doing wrong? I just use [self sendActionsForControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchDown]; once and the target action is called twice. What's wrong with my code?

Sandro Meier

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Is the the sender of the TouchUpInside Event "self" in both calls? I'm not so sure about the view hierarchy in Cocoa Touch, but it may happen that you are receiving the touch up event of the "self" object and a subview of self at the same time. –  huesforalice Jul 14 '11 at 8:01
    
Yes. Both times the sender is the same object of my UIControl subclass. –  Sandro Meier Jul 14 '11 at 8:17
2  
The reason this target gets called twice is that the system automatically sends a UIControlEventTouchDown message, and in your control you are sending a second one. Other than that, what you are doing is perfectly reasonable. You don't need the beginTrackingWithTouch at all if you just want the automatic touch messages which are UIControlEventTouchXXXXX. But you would need these functions if you are changing the look of your control with the touch events. –  Robotbugs Oct 10 '13 at 20:21
    
thanks Robotbugs, that solved it! –  horseshoe7 Nov 25 '13 at 16:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The first call to the action method happens automatically by the event dispatcher once you've called:

[markItem addTarget:self action:@selector(action:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];

to register the handler.

So when you then call:

//Touch Down
[self sendActionsForControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchDown];

you are generating the second call to your handler (and any others that are hooked up).

So it seems like you don't need both the action handler and the beginTracking - use one or the other.

Update:

Given your comment and further thought: since you are a subclass of UIControl, I think you probably don't want to be registering for event handlers for yourself.

Instead you should exclusively use:

- (BOOL)beginTrackingWithTouch:(UITouch *)touch withEvent:(UIEvent *)event;
- (BOOL)continueTrackingWithTouch:(UITouch *)touch withEvent:(UIEvent *)event;
- (void)endTrackingWithTouch:(UITouch *)touch withEvent:(UIEvent *)event;
- (void)cancelTrackingWithEvent:(UIEvent *)event;   // event may be nil if cancelled for non-event reasons, e.g. removed from window

Also the tracking instance variable.

So I think you should not be posting events or listening to events. Further, is it actually possible to get a beginTrackingWithTouch event if it's not in your view? Doesn't seem like it would be. So I don't think you need the testing to see if it's in your view.

So I think it might be worth stepping back and thinking about what you are trying to do and re-reading UIControl documentation. Specifically:

Subclassing Notes You may want to extend a UIControl subclass for either of two reasons:

To observe or modify the dispatch of action messages to targets for particular events To do this, override sendAction:to:forEvent:, evaluate the passed-in selector, target object, or UIControlEvents bit mask, and proceed as required.

To provide custom tracking behavior (for example, to change the highlight appearance) To do this, override one or all of the following methods: beginTrackingWithTouch:withEvent:, continueTrackingWithTouch:withEvent:, endTrackingWithTouch:withEvent:.

The first part is for having your UIControl subclass do non-standard handling of target action processing for clients or users of your control (that doesn't sound like what you are trying to do, though you didn't really give a high-level description).

The second part sounds more like what you are wanting to do - custom tracking within your UIControl subclass.

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Thank you for the answer. But I need the begin tracking, to determine if a touch is inside. So you think I just have to let self sendActionsForControlEvents: away? –  Sandro Meier Jul 16 '11 at 11:53
    
expanded the answer above, try giving it another read and see if that helps. –  Dad Jul 17 '11 at 5:16
    
To clarify my question. The line where I add ad Target and selector to markItem is outside the subclass and markItem is an object of my UIControl subclass. I'll try what you said. So the 4 tracking methods should handle the sending of the messages. –  Sandro Meier Jul 17 '11 at 9:57
    
Thank you man! I know got how to subclass it correctly. The tracking methods send the actoins accordingly! If I use touchesBegan (ect.) I need to send the actions. But the tracking methods do that for me. If I just remove the lines where I send the actions, I works as espected! Thank you! –  Sandro Meier Jul 17 '11 at 11:24

Hm.. Check my code for your aims:

UIContr.h

@interface UIContr : UIControl {

}

@end

UIContr.m

#import "UIContr.h"
@implementation UIContr
- (id)initWithFrame:(CGRect)frame {

    self = [super initWithFrame:frame];
    if (self) {
        // Initialization code.
    }
    return self;
}

- (BOOL)beginTrackingWithTouch:(UITouch *)touch withEvent:(UIEvent *)event {
    NSLog(@"Start");
    CGPoint location = [touch locationInView:self];
    if (CGRectContainsPoint(self.frame, location)) {
        //Touch Down
        [self sendActionsForControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchDown];
        return YES;
    }
    else {
        return NO;
    }  
}

- (void)dealloc {
    [super dealloc];
}
@end

How to use in UIViewController:

- (void)viewDidLoad {
    UIContr *c = [[UIContr alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(20, 20, 100, 100)];
    [c addTarget:self action:@selector(action:) forControlEvents:UIControlEventTouchUpInside];
    c.backgroundColor = [UIColor redColor];
    [self.view addSubview:c];
}

-(void)action:(id)sender{
    NSLog(@"123");
}
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All works fine. "Start" and "123" prints to console only once. Try to experement also with UIControlEventTouchDown/UIControlEventTouchUpInside –  beryllium Jul 14 '11 at 8:26
    
It's strange. All my code looks like yours. Only the part where you check if the point is inside the view is different. And I get the action called twice... :-( –  Sandro Meier Jul 14 '11 at 9:17
    
Its only being called once because you are registering for UIControlEventTouchUpInside and not UIControlEventTouchDown which you are trying to send from the control. –  Robotbugs Oct 10 '13 at 20:19
    
You do not need to check the location in the view. The point is always going to be in the view in beginTrackingWithTouch. –  Robotbugs Oct 10 '13 at 20:20

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