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Assuming i have the following classes:

Class MainClass
{
   private OtherClass1;
   MainClass()
   {
      OtherClass1 = new OtherClass1();
   }

   void dispose()
   {
      OtherClass1 = null;
   }
}

class OtherClass1
{
   private OtherClass2;
   OtherClass1()
   {
      OtherClass2 = new OtherClass2();
   }
}

class OtherClass2
{
}

If i instatiate MainClass and later call dispose method, does the OtherClass1 gets garbage collected (later on)? Or do i have first to clear the reference to OtherClass2?

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You should use the IDisposable interface to utilize the full potential of the Dispose method –  peer Jul 14 '11 at 8:07
    
@peer: only when resources are involved. The question is only about memory. –  Henk Holterman Jul 14 '11 at 11:07

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In the code as provided, you don't have to null anything, you can safely remove your dispose() and all will be well.

If your OtherClass1 and/or OtherClass2 are managed resources, ie they implement the IDisposable interface then your code is not good enough. You then will have to chain the Dispose:

class MainClass : IDisposable
{
   private OtherClass1;
   MainClass()
   {
      OtherClass1 = new OtherClass1();
   }

   public void Dispose()
   {
      OtherClass1.Dispose(); 
      // OtherClass1 = null;  // not needed
   }
}
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The dispose is there to simulate a process where the OtherClass1 is no longer needed. –  sysboard Jul 14 '11 at 17:14
    
@sysboard: that does not mean anything if you don't indicate if OtherClass1 is holding resources. –  Henk Holterman Jul 14 '11 at 17:16
    
It does, but you just given me further insight. –  sysboard Jul 14 '11 at 22:27

An object will get garbage collected if it has no references, or the references it does have are from objects that themselves don't have references (and so on).

A way of visualising it, is the garbage collector will walk the object reference graph, following all object references, making a note of ones it gets to (still referenced from somewhere). Any it doesn't get to are eligible for garbage collection as if it didn't get to them then they can't possibly be used.

See here for in-depth info (particularly "The Garbage Collection Algorithm"): http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/bb985010.aspx

So yes, it'll be eligible to be GC'd.


Also, if you have a dispose method you really should implement IDisposable.

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I would like to vote your answer as helpful but alas my reputation is still low. –  sysboard Jul 14 '11 at 17:16
    
A slight caveat: objects should be regarded as having three states: live, finalizable, and unreferenced. Rooted objects are live, as are objects referred to by live objects. Non-live objects with registered finalizers are finalizable, as are non-live objects to which they refer. Finalizable objects cannot be deleted as long as they're finalizable, but objects with registered finalizers will get deregistered and have their finalizers run (whereupon they will be unreferenced unless some live references are added in the meantime). –  supercat Jul 14 '11 at 21:07
    
@supercat is right, and there's one more thing to remember: the order of finalization is not deterministic either. This means that if you have two finalizable object A and B, any may be first finalized, no matter if and what references they have from one to the other. Therefore you cannot rely on having non-finalized object references in the finalizer. This is the reason why good practice is to make finalizable objects as small as possible and without references to other objects (a private small finalizable "handle wrapper" helper object is better than making a "big" object finalizable). –  Lucero Jul 14 '11 at 22:28
    
@Lucero: Good point. If a finalizer holds a reference to another object, the system will guarantee that the other object will not have been garbage-collected, but it may have already been finalized or (for future versions of .net) it might be in the process of finalization. If finalizable objects have to enforce an ordering among themselves, it would probably not be a bad idea to guard each object with a flag updated via Interlocked.Exchange to ensure that no effort is made to finalize an object which is in the process of finalization. –  supercat Jul 14 '11 at 22:33
    
@supercat, I would personally never use a design which requires an ordering of the finalizers (and I don't know of a case where this would be required). Even if you'd guard them and have them ensure the correct order of disposal, things get more complicated in the event of concurrent finalization and GC, because a single flag is not good enough and using more complex synchronization structures seems like it wouldn't be a good idea either. I'm following Joe Duffy's blog and i'm not a complete beginner in this subject; maybe that's the reason why I have so much respect for those issues. –  Lucero Jul 14 '11 at 22:46

If there is no other reference to it, it may at some time be garbage collected. Note that this is not deterministic, you cannot rely on it being collected in a specific timespan.

In general, you shouldn't worry too much abot this, the GC in .NET can by design handle circular references etc. without any problem. Setting fields to null is usually not required. The Dispose method is usually used to release unmanaged resources, such as database connections etc. in a deterministic fashion; it's not about freeing the memory of the object being disposed.

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I would like to vote your answer as helpful but alas my reputation is still low. –  sysboard Jul 14 '11 at 17:17
    
@Henk Holterman: Finalization is often confused with garbage-collection. Finalization occurs when an object would be eligible for garbage-collection but for the existence of finalization (neither objects registered for finalization, nor any objects to which they refer, are ever eligible for garbage collection). –  supercat Jul 14 '11 at 21:40
    
@Henk Holterman: If objects have registered finalizers, the time at which they would have been garbage collected in the absence of finalization strongly correlates with the time their finalizers get called. The non-determinism of the time objects are noticed as being eligible for GC translates into non-determinism of when finalizers run, and that often is noticeable. –  supercat Jul 14 '11 at 22:03
    
The nondeterminism is clear from the concept of the mark-and-sweep-type GCs which are used in Java and .NET. The time when they run does not have any relation to the moment a reference is changed (set to null) for instance. Therefore, even if you take the finalization out of the equation and for instance just watch the memory usage, you'll see that clearing references does not cause memory to be freed right away. You can also monitor this by using a weak reference (or just GC handles in .NET), which have no influence on the GC, but allows to check whether an object has been collected or not. –  Lucero Jul 14 '11 at 22:21
    
@Lucero: I forgot about weak references. Those two allow the non-determinism to be observed (for better or for worse). –  supercat Jul 14 '11 at 22:35

The best practice is to implement IDisposable interface and implementing the Dispose() method.

At Dispose(), you just release the resources used by your object such as any external resources, COM references, database connections, etc.

In terms of When the object will be garbage collected, it's up to the .NET engine to decide that as they frequently update their disposal algorithm with each release.

In general, when an object is orphan (no variable references it), it will be in the queue to be garbage collected.

You can manually call GC.Collect(); but that's not recommended since it interferes .NET garbage collection mechanism.

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The term "Dispose" is a bit of a misnomer, since the Dispose method doesn't delete the targeted object but rather serves a request for the targeted object to do anything that will need to be done before it may be safely abandoned. Essentially, it's a request for the object to put its affairs in order.

The most common situation when a particular object will need to put its affairs in order is when some entities outside of it may be doing something, storing something, refraining from doing something, or otherwise temporarily altering their behavior on its behalf. Note that the entities may be .net objects, other types of OS-recognized objects (GDI handles, etc.), etc. but there's no particular requirement that the entity be any particular kind of thing, nor that they be in the same computer, or even any computer. For an object to puts its affairs in order, outside entities doing, holding, etc. anything on its behalf need to be told that they no longer need to do so. If the entities in question are .net objects that implement IDisposable, the notification would be generally performed by calling their Dispose method.

Note that .net provides a means by which objects can ask to be notified if the system notices that they've been abandoned, and use that as a cue to put their affairs in order. Such notifications may not come in timely fashion, and various factors may cause them to be delayed essentially indefinitely, but the mechanism (called "finalization") is sometimes better than nothing.

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Would the down-voter care to state what aspect of my answer is inaccurate? –  supercat Jul 17 '11 at 6:59

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