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Possible Duplicates:
constructor invocation mechanism
Why is it an error to use an empty set of brackets to call a constructor with no arguments?

Why can this code elide all copies of A?

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
  A() {}
  A(const A&) { std::cout << "Copy" << std::endl; }
};

class B
{
public:
  B(const A& a_) : a(a_) {}
private:
  A a;
};

int main()
{
  B b(A());
}

This code apparently makes no copies of A, and outputs nothing under gcc 3.4 at ideone.

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marked as duplicate by iammilind, ybungalobill, Bo Persson, Clinton, Dori Jul 14 '11 at 11:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The problem is not copy elision, but the meaning of the declaration:

B b(A());
// To get it working the way you expect [1]
B b = B(A());
// Or the slightly more obtuse.
B b((A()));

To the compiler is a function declaration. Google / search SO for the most-vexing-parse. More in the C++ FAQ lite including workarounds.


[1]: This is not exactly the same, as this requires an implicit conversion from A to B. If B was defined as:

class B {
  A a;
public:
  explicit B(const A& a_) : a(a_) {}
};

Then this would not be an alternative.

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Use:

B b((A()));

your line is a function declaration. Unfortunately C allowed function declarations inside functions (which BTW seem pretty useless to me), so for backward compatibility reasons C++ allows this to. You can enforce variable definition with extra parentheses.

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B b(A());

You think this declares a variable? No.

It declares a function b whose return type is B and accepts a parameter of type A (*)() .

See this topic:


So if you want to declare a variable, put an extra braces around A() as:

B b((A())); //it declares an object
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1  
Alternatively, instead of adding parenthesis use an equals sign: B b = A(); is almost equivalent to B b(( A() )); (difference being present only if the B(A) constructor was explicit) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 14 '11 at 8:30
    
@David, why almost? Both are exactly same. I think explicit is not standard C++. –  iammilind Jul 14 '11 at 8:44
    
@iammilind: You can mark a constructor as explicit, and then it will not be used by implicit conversions. If B was declared as struct B { explicit B( A const & ) {} }; then B b(( A() )); would work (code explicitly requests that constructor) while B b = A(); would not because there is no implicit conversion from A to B. B b = A(); is processed by the compiler as B b = B(( A() )); where the left hand side conversion is implicit. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 14 '11 at 9:17

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