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I configure a ssh command key like (in a remote mashine M1):

command="/usr/bin/nslookup",no-port-forwarding,no-X11-forwarding,no-agent-forwarding ssh-dss DEADBEEFDEADBEEF= mycow@farm.org

To allow to run nslookup in M1 from a client machine C1. It works and i can run:

C1> ssh -i mylookup_key M1

And i get the nslookup execution on M1, but i need to pass parameters to get real work. How can i pass parameters to ssh command key?

p.d: I'm using nslookup as an example of the real program that I want to exec.

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Just put the parameters after "/usr/bin/nslookup " in the string? –  Jacob Jul 14 '11 at 8:22
    
Great, it works, but i get errors when iI try to use parameters on the command like "-h" and ssh treat as own. –  Zhen Jul 14 '11 at 9:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Take a look at the $SSH_ORIGINAL_COMMAND variable which should contain the command passed to ssh. For example:

command="/usr/bin/nslookup $SSH_ORIGINAL_COMMAND",no-port-forwarding,no-X11-forwarding,no-agent-forwarding ssh-dss DEADBEEFDEADBEEF= mycow@farm.org

Then try:

$ ssh -i mylookup_key M1 stackoverflow.com
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Have you tried enclosing the command in ' or "? Soemthing like

ssh host "ls -l -a .."

which gives me

total 12
drwxr-xr-x  3 root  root  4096 2011-06-16 12:33 .
drwxr-xr-x 22 root  root  4096 2011-06-16 13:40 ..
drwxr-xr-x 49 mihai mihai 4096 2011-07-14 10:33 mihai

meaning that it works

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If I understand correctly you just want to run a command on the remote machine. The simple case is to just pass the command as the last parameter to ssh

ssh -i mylookup_key M1 nslookup stackoverflow.com

But you may need to be careful about quoting and special characters. e.g.

ssh -i mylookup_key M1 ./args.sh "1 2 3"
PROG:./args.sh
ARG[1]: 1
ARG[2]: 2
ARG[3]: 3
ssh -i mylookup_key M1 ./args.sh '"1 2 3"'
PROG:./args.sh
ARG[1]: 1 2 3
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