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I have a form that I want to validate looks like this:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.1//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml11/DTD/xhtml11.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
<script type="text/javascript" src="scripts/validate.js"></script>
</head>
<body>
<form name="frmRegister" method="post" action="register.aspx"  onsubmit="return validate(this);">
    <div>
      <label for="txtUsername">Username:</label>
      <input type="text" name="txtUserName" id="txtUserName" size="12" />
    </div>
    <div>
      <label for="txtPassword">Password: </td></label>
      <input type="password" name="txtPassword" id="txtPassword" size="12" />
    </div>
    <div>
      <label for="txtPassword2">Confirm your password:</label>
      <input type="password" name="txtPassword2" id="txtPassword2" size="12" />
    </div>
    <div>
      <input type="submit" value="Log in"  />
    </div>
</form>
</body>
</html>

and the validate function in an external file called validate like this:

function validate(form) {
  var returnValue = true;
  var username = form.txtUserName.value;
  var password1 = form.txtPassword.value;
  var password2 = form.txtPassword2.value;

if(username.length < 6) {
  returnValue = false;
  alert("Your username must be at least\n6 characters long.\nPlease try again.");
  frmRegister.txtUserName.focus();
}

if (password1.length < 6) {
  returnValue = false;
  alert("Your password must be at least\n6 characters long.\nPlease try again.");
  frmRegister.txtPassword.value = "";
  frmRegister.txtPassword2.value = "";
  frmRegister.txtPassword.focus();
}

if (password1 != password2) {
  returnValue = false;
  alert("Your password entries did not match.\nPlease try again.");
  frmRegister.txtPassword.value = "";
  frmRegister.txtPassword2.value = "";
  frmRegister.txtPassword.focus();
}
  return returnValue;
}

But Firefox 5 keeps sending it to register.aspx even though the form doesnt pass the test?

share|improve this question
    
Try with onsubmit="validate(this);" –  lam3r4370 Jul 14 '11 at 10:04
    
have you checked the firebug for the value of returnValue –  anu Jul 14 '11 at 10:05
    
Did other browsers do it right? Usally there is a javascript error causing this behavior. Did you checkt it in firebug? –  DanielB Jul 14 '11 at 10:06
    
Yes checked in Firebug and value for returnValue is false –  Chris_45 Jul 14 '11 at 10:08
    
Tried this and it works in all browsers: <script>function validate() {return false;}</script><form onsubmit="return validate();" action="#test"><input type="submit"/></form> –  Max Jul 14 '11 at 10:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You haven't defined frmRegister.

Internet Explorer will (depending, IIRC, on the version and if you are in quirks mode or not) spew a global variable into existence for every element with an id (and some with a name). Other browsers won't.

When you try things like:

frmRegister.txtPassword.value = "";

The browser will error because frmRegister is undefined so can't have a .txtPassword.

When it errors, the script dies and the return statement is never reached.

Since return is never reached, the submission isn't canceled, and the form is sent to the server as normal.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok like this: form.txtUserName.focus(); This must be the best way to use the parameter or should one go inte document.forms generally speaking? –  Chris_45 Jul 14 '11 at 10:25
    
document.forms.theForm gives you the same object as passing this from the submit event handler. The latter is generally more reusable and thus better. –  Quentin Jul 14 '11 at 10:31
    
Ok it works internal because then it knows what frmRegister is but how can i work it IE and Chrome? Something with that global variable that makes it visible even though external? –  Chris_45 Jul 14 '11 at 10:45
    
IE and Chrome support passing in this and using that variable just fine. –  Quentin Jul 14 '11 at 10:47
    
Ok so IE and Chrome makes this = frmRegister and knows about it and uses it but Firefox also makes this = frmRegister but cannot use it –  Chris_45 Jul 14 '11 at 10:50

Try, instead of returning validate(this), returning false. If the form is not submitted then, try returning validate(this), but, in that function, before actually returning the returnValue, try alerting it to make sure it's actually false. Maybe it's due to your focusing elements. Maybe you could first return the returnValue, but do the focussing via setTimetout('focus()', intervalInMillisecons)?

Also, try it in other browsers like Safari or Chrome and see if you get the same results.

Also, try temporarily removing the DOCTYPE. Works wonders sometimes.

share|improve this answer
    
Chrome IE ok .. –  Chris_45 Jul 14 '11 at 10:10
    
Removing the Doctype triggers quirks mode, which leads to inconsistencies between browsers. Occasionally it will work around an error (in your code, not in browsers) but will almost always cause more problems then it solves. Never work outside of Standards mode. –  Quentin Jul 14 '11 at 10:20
    
Yes I wouldnt like to have pages without doctype –  Chris_45 Jul 14 '11 at 10:28

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