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Create a UserArray of bit fields which can be declared as follows: The size occupied by our Array will be less then a normal array. Suppose we want an ARRAY of 20 FLAGs (TRUE/FALSE). A bool FLAG[20] will take 20 bytes of memory, while UserArray<bool,bool,0,20> will take 4 bytes of memory.

  • Use class Template to create user array.
  • Use Bit wise operators to pack the array.
  • Equality operation should also be implemented.

    template<class T,int W,int L,int H>//i have used template<class T> 
                                       //but never used such way
    class UserArray{ 
            //....                 
    };        
    typedef UserArray<bool,4,0,20> MyType;
    

where:

  • T = type of an array element
  • W = width of an array element, 0 < W < 8
  • L = low bound of array index (preferably zero)
  • H = high bound of array index

A main program:

int main() {
      MyType Display;  //typedef UserArray<T,W,L,H> MyType; defined above

      Display[0] = FALSE; //need to understand that how can we write this?
      Display[1] = TRUE; //need to understand that how can we write this?

      //assert(Display[0]);//commented once, need to understand above code first
      //assert(Display[1]);//commented once..
      //cout << “Size of the Display” << sizeof(Display);//commented once..
}

My doubt is how those parameters i.e T,L,W & H are used in class UserArray and how can we write instance of UserArray as Display[0] & Display[1] what does it represent?

Short & simple example of similar type will be easy for me to understand.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

W, L and H are non-type template parameters. You can instantiate a template (at compile-time) with constant values, e.g.:

template <int N>
class MyArray
{
public:
    float data[N];

    void print() { std::cout << "MyArray of size " << N << std::endl; }
};

MyArray<7> foo;
MyArray<8> bar;

foo.print();  // "MyArray of size 7"
bar.print();  // "MyArray of size 8"

In the example above, everywhere that N appears in the template definition, it will be replaced at compile-time by the supplied constant.

Note that MyArray<7> and MyArray<8> are completely different types as far as the compile is concerned.

I have no idea what the solution to your specific problem is. But your code won't compile, currently, as you have not provided values for the template parameters.

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MyType is type definition for UserArray<T,W,L,H>. –  Abhineet Jul 14 '11 at 10:20
    
@Abhineet: But you have not supplied values for T, W, L and H. –  Oli Charlesworth Jul 14 '11 at 10:20
    
Ok got it. But one more doubt, How Display[0] & Display[1] when Display is not array type. –  Abhineet Jul 14 '11 at 10:26
    
@Abhineet: You can overload UserArray::operator[]. –  Oli Charlesworth Jul 14 '11 at 10:51
    
ok. Thanks a lot –  Abhineet Jul 14 '11 at 11:28
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This is not simple, particularly as you can have variable bit widths.

<limits.h> has a constant CHAR_BIT, which is the number of bits in a byte. Usually this is 8, but it could be greater than 8 (not less though).

I suggest the number of elements per byte be CHAR_BIT / W. This might waste a few bits for example, if width is 3 and CHAR_BIT is 8, but this is complicated enough as is.

You'll then need to define operator[] to access the elements, and likely need to do some bit fiddling to do this. For the non-const version of operator[], you'll probably have to return some sort of proxy object when there are more than one elements in a byte, and have its operator= overridden so it writes back to the appropriate spot in the array.

It's a good exercise though to figure this one out though.

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Ok u mean to say Display[0] & Display[1] are actually using operator[]. –  Abhineet Jul 14 '11 at 10:28
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Here's some code that implements what you ask for, except the lower bound is fixed at 0. It also shows a rare use case for the address_of operator. You could take this further and make this container compatible with STL algorithms if you liked.

#include <iostream>
#include <limits.h>
#include <stddef.h>

template<class T, size_t WIDTH, size_t SIZE>
class UserArray;

template<class T, size_t WIDTH, size_t SIZE>
class UserArrayProxy;

template<class T, size_t WIDTH, size_t SIZE>
class UserArrayAddressProxy
{
public:
  typedef UserArray<T, WIDTH, SIZE> array_type;
  typedef UserArrayProxy<T, WIDTH, SIZE> proxy_type;
  typedef UserArrayAddressProxy<T, WIDTH, SIZE> this_type;

  UserArrayAddressProxy(array_type& a_, size_t i_) : a(a_), i(i_) {}
  UserArrayAddressProxy(const this_type& x) : a(x.a), i(x.i) {}

  proxy_type operator*() { return proxy_type(a, i); }

  this_type& operator+=(size_t n) { i += n; return *this; }
  this_type& operator-=(size_t n) { i -= n; return *this; }

  this_type& operator++() { ++i; return *this; }
  this_type& operator--() { --i; return *this; }

  this_type operator++(int) { this_type x = *this; ++i; return x; }
  this_type operator--(int) { this_type x = *this; --i; return x; }

  this_type operator+(size_t n) const { this_type x = *this; x += n; return x; }
  this_type operator-(size_t n) const { this_type x = *this; x -= n; return x; }

  bool operator==(const this_type& x) { return (&a == &x.a) && (i == x.i); }
  bool operator!=(const this_type& x) { return !(*this == x); }
private:
  array_type& a;
  size_t i;
};


template<class T, size_t WIDTH, size_t SIZE>
class UserArrayProxy
{
public:
  static const size_t BITS_IN_T = sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT;
  static const size_t ELEMENTS_PER_T = BITS_IN_T / WIDTH;
  static const size_t NUMBER_OF_TS = (SIZE - 1) / ELEMENTS_PER_T + 1;
  static const T MASK = (1 << WIDTH) - 1;

  typedef UserArray<T, WIDTH, SIZE> array_type;
  typedef UserArrayProxy<T, WIDTH, SIZE> this_type;
  typedef UserArrayAddressProxy<T, WIDTH, SIZE> address_proxy_type;

  UserArrayProxy(array_type& a_, int i_) : a(a_), i(i_) {}

  this_type& operator=(T x)
  {
    a.write(i, x);
    return *this;
  }

  address_proxy_type operator&() { return address_proxy_type(a, i); }

  operator T()
  {
    return a.get(i);
  }
private:
  array_type& a;
  size_t i;
};

template<class T, size_t WIDTH, size_t SIZE>
class UserArray
{
public:
  typedef UserArrayAddressProxy<T, WIDTH, SIZE> ptr_t;

  static const size_t BITS_IN_T = sizeof(T) * CHAR_BIT;
  static const size_t ELEMENTS_PER_T = BITS_IN_T / WIDTH;
  static const size_t NUMBER_OF_TS = (SIZE - 1) / ELEMENTS_PER_T + 1;
  static const T MASK = (1 << WIDTH) - 1;

  T operator[](size_t i) const
  {
    return get(i);
  }

  UserArrayProxy<T, WIDTH, SIZE> operator[](size_t i)
  {
    return UserArrayProxy<T, WIDTH, SIZE>(*this, i);
  }

  friend class UserArrayProxy<T, WIDTH, SIZE>;
private:
  void write(size_t i, T x)
  {
    T& element = data[i / ELEMENTS_PER_T];
    int offset = (i % ELEMENTS_PER_T) * WIDTH;
    x &= MASK;
    element &= ~(MASK << offset);
    element |= x << offset;
  }

  T get(size_t i)
  {
    return (data[i / ELEMENTS_PER_T] >> ((i % ELEMENTS_PER_T) * WIDTH)) & MASK;
  }
  T data[NUMBER_OF_TS];
};

int main()
{
  typedef UserArray<int, 6, 20> myarray_t;
  myarray_t a;
  std::cout << "Sizeof a in bytes: " << sizeof(a) << std::endl;
  for (size_t i = 0; i != 20; ++i) { a[i] = i; }
  for (size_t i = 0; i != 20; ++i) { std::cout << a[i] << std::endl; }
  std::cout << "We can even use address_of operator: " << std::endl;
  for (myarray_t::ptr_t e = &a[0]; e != &a[20]; ++e) { std::cout << *e << std::endl; }
}
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