Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a handler attached to an event and I would like it to execute only if it is triggered by a human, and not by a trigger() method. How do I tell the difference?

For example,

$('.checkbox').change(function(e){
  if (e.isHuman())
  {
    alert ('human');
  }
});

$('.checkbox').trigger('change'); //doesn't alert
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 53 down vote accepted

You can check e.originalEvent: if it's defined the click is human:

Look at the fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/Uf8Wv/

$('.checkbox').change(function(e){
  if (e.originalEvent !== undefined)
  {
    alert ('human');
  }
});

my example in the fiddle:

<input type='checkbox' id='try' >try
<button id='click'>Click</button>

$("#try").click(function(event) {
    if (event.originalEvent === undefined) {
        alert('not human')
    } else {
        alert(' human');
    }


});

$('#click').click(function(event) {
    $("#try").click();
});
share|improve this answer
    
+1 This is exactly how I was going to suggest it's done. –  Treborbob Jul 14 '11 at 11:08
    
@Nicola Is this documented anywhere? –  Šime Vidas Jul 14 '11 at 11:15
    
@Sime i don't know, but i think it's standard. look here:api.jquery.com/category/events/event-object –  Nicola Peluchetti Jul 14 '11 at 11:28
    
@Nicola I see, it's a jQuery thing. jQuery stores the original event object inside this property. Btw, what do you mean you don't know? You just provided the link to the documentation :) –  Šime Vidas Jul 14 '11 at 11:41
    
@Sime i just meant that i didn't know if it was some kinf od ECMA standard! :) –  Nicola Peluchetti Jul 14 '11 at 12:20

I think that the only way to do this would be to pass in an additional parameter on the trigger call as per the documentation.

$('.checkbox').change(function(e, isTriggered){
  if (!isTriggered)
  {
    alert ('human');
  }
});

$('.checkbox').trigger('change', [true]); //doesn't alert

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/wG2KY/

share|improve this answer
1  
you can check out the property originalEvent of the event object: if the event doesn't come from a click, it's undefined –  Nicola Peluchetti Jul 14 '11 at 11:13
    

More straight forward than above would be:

$('.checkbox').change(function(e){
  if (e.isTrigger)
  {
    alert ('not a human');
  }
});

$('.checkbox').trigger('change'); //doesn't alert
share|improve this answer
    
This is the best answer. For explanation, see: stackoverflow.com/questions/10704168/… –  jaredjacobs May 10 '13 at 21:42
1  
While this is tempting and probably cozy in practice, note that the jQuery developers do not wish to graduate isTrigger to the public API as of this time. –  Jon Sep 23 '13 at 12:53

haha, nice question. Hm... I would think about a possibility where you check the mouse position.

functionality: "Click" -> "Get mouse position" -> "Overlaps the coords of the button" -> ...

share|improve this answer

You can use onmousedown to detect mouse click vs trigger() call.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.