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I have a producer app that generates an index (stores it in some in-memory tree data structure). And a consumer app will use the index to search for partial matches.

I don't want the consumer UI to have to block (e.g. via some progress bar) while the producer is indexing the data. Basically if the user wishes to use the partial index, it will just do so. In this case, the producer will potentially have to stop indexing for a while until the user goes away to another screen.

Roughly, I know I will need the wait/notify protocol to achieve this. My question: is it possible to interrupt the producer thread using wait/notify while it is doing its business ? What java.util.concurrent primitives do I need to achieve this ?

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4 Answers 4

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In your producer thread, you are likely to have some kind of main loop. This is probably the best place to interrupt your producer. Instead of using wait() and notify() I suggest you use the java synchronization objects introduced in java 5.

You could potentially do something like that

class Indexer {

   Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();    

    public void index(){
        while(somecondition){
            this.lock.lock();
            try{
                // perform one indexing step
            }finally{
                lock.unlock();
            }
        }
    }

    public Item lookup(){
        this.lock.lock();
        try{
            // perform your lookup
        }finally{
            lock.unlock();
        }
    }
}

You need to make sure that each time the indexer releases the lock, your index is in a consistent, legal state. In this scenario, when the indexer releases the lock, it leaves a chance for a new or waiting lookup() operation to take the lock, complete and release the lock, at which point your indexer can proceed to its next step. If no lookup() is currently waiting, then your indexer just reaquires the lock itself and goes on with its next operation.

If you think you might have more that one thread trying to do the lookup at the same time, you might want to have a look at the ReadWriteLock interface and ReentrantReadWriteLock implementation.

Of course this solution is the simple way to do it. It will block either one of the threads that doesn't have the lock. You may want to check if you can just synchronize on your data structure directly, but that might prove tricky since building indexes tends to use some sort of balanced tree or B-Tree or whatnot where node insertion is far from being trivial.

I suggest you first try that simple approach, then see if the way it behaves suits you. If it doesn't, you may either try breaking up the the indexing steps into smaller steps, or try synchronizing on only parts of your data structure.

Don't worry too much about the performance of locking, in java uncontended locking (when only one thread is trying to take the lock) is cheap. As long as most of your locking is uncontented, locking performance is nothing to be concerned about.

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The way you've described this, there's no reason that you need wait/notify. Simply synchronize access to your data structure, to ensure that it is in a consistent state when accessed.

Edit: by "synchronize access", I do not mean synchronize the entire data structure (which would end up blocking either producer or consumer). Instead, synchronize only those bits that are being updated, and only at the time that you update them. You'll find that most of the producer's work can take place in an unsynchronized manner: for example, if you're building a tree, you can identify the node where the insert needs to happen, synchronize on that node, do the insert, then continue on.

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You're suggesting something akin to row locking in databases. Currently the tree is locked to allow one thread to pass through. –  Jacques René Mesrine Mar 21 '09 at 20:42

The producer application can have two indices: published and in-work. The producer will work only with in-work, the consumer will work only with published. Once the producer done with indexing it can replace in-work one with published (usually swapping one pointer). The producer may also publish copy of the partial index if will bring value. This way you will avoid long term locks -- it will be useful when index accessed by lost of consumers.

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No, that's not possible.

The only way of notifying a thread without any explicit code in the thread itself is to use Thread.interrupt(), which will cause an exception in the thread. interrrupt() is usually not very reliable though, because throwing a exception at some random point in the code is a nightmare to get right in all code paths. Beside that, a single try{}catch(Throwable){} somewhere in the thread (including any libraries that you use) could be enough to swallow the signal.

In most cases, the only correct solution is use a shared flag or a queue that the consumer can use to pass messages to the producer. If you worry about the producer being unresponsive or freezing, run it in a separate thread and require it to send heartbeat messages every n seconds. If it does not send a heartbeat, kill it. (Note that determining whether a producer is actually freezing, and not just waiting for an external event, is often very hard to get right as well).

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There are some good ideas here, but there are some outright errors too. Interrupting a thread will not raise an exception "at some random point". InterruptedExceptions are checked, and methods that might throw them are well-defined. Badly written "catch-all" blocks are enough to break any program. –  erickson Mar 21 '09 at 17:25
    
Your suggestion about the queue is quite interesting. What I could do is to make the Producer check for request from the consumer every 10 tree nodes processed. I just to be sure this looks responsive to the user. –  Jacques René Mesrine Mar 21 '09 at 20:38

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