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I have some bells in my database with the same number I want to get all of them without duplication then I create a compare class to do this work but the execution of the function make a lot delay from the function without distinct, from 0.6 sec to 3.2 sec!!! Am I do it right or I have to use another method!!

       reg.AddRange((from a in this.dataContext.reglements
                     join b in this.dataContext.Clients on a.Id_client equals b.Id
                     where a.date_v <= datefin && a.date_v >= datedeb
                     where a.Id_client == b.Id
                     orderby a.date_v descending 
                     select new Class_reglement
                     {
                         nom = b.Nom,
                         code = b.code,
                         Numf = a.Numf,
                     }).AsEnumerable().Distinct(new Compare()).ToList());


    class Compare : IEqualityComparer<Class_reglement>
    {
        public bool Equals(Class_reglement x, Class_reglement y)
        {
            if (x.Numf == y.Numf)
            {
                return true;
            }
            else { return false; }
        }
        public int GetHashCode(Class_reglement codeh)
        {
            return 0;
        }

    }
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7  
You might want to take a look at Guidelines and rules for GetHashCode –  Conrad Frix Jul 14 '11 at 14:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 47 down vote accepted

No wonder, considering your GetHashCode implementation which always returns the same value. Distinct relies on a good hash function to work efficiently.

In your code, the solution is to forward GetHashCode to Class_reglement.Numf.GetHashCode and implement it appropriately there.

Furthermore, your Equals code is an abomination that should be compressed into one expression:

class Compare : IEqualityComparer<Class_reglement>
{
    public bool Equals(Class_reglement x, Class_reglement y)
    {
        return x.Numf == y.Numf;
    }
    public int GetHashCode(Class_reglement codeh)
    {
        return codeh.Numf.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Furthermore, your ToList call is unnecessary and time-consuming. AddRange accepts any IEnumerable so conversion to a List isn’t required. AsEnumerable is also redundant here since processing the result in AddRange will cause this anyway.

All in all, it seems that a lot of code was written without understanding what it actually does (this is called cargo cult programming). This may seem to work temporarily but it doesn’t work long-term: take a time-out and try to understand what you are writing, preferably while reading a book on C#.

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21  
+1 for abomination, lmao –  maxbeaudoin Jul 14 '11 at 14:13
    
+1 thx it work in 0.9sec :) –  Akrem Jul 14 '11 at 14:20
3  
Your Equals fails when either x or y is null. –  dzendras Dec 17 '12 at 12:46
2  
@dzendras Same for GetHashCode. However, note that the documentation of IEqualityComparer<T> doesn’t specify what to do with null arguments – but the examples provided in the article don’t handle null either. –  Konrad Rudolph Dec 17 '12 at 12:55

Try This code:

public class GenericCompare<T> : IEqualityComparer<T> where T : class
{
    private Func<T, object> _expr { get; set; }
    public GenericCompare(Func<T, object> expr)
    {
        this._expr = expr;
    }
    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        var first = _expr.Invoke(x);
        var sec = _expr.Invoke(y);
        if (first != null && first.Equals(sec))
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }
    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        return obj.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Example of its use would be

collection = collection
    .Except(ExistedDataEles, new GenericCompare<DataEle>(x=>x.Id))
    .ToList(); 
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1  
GetHashCode needs to use the expression as well: return _expr.Invoke(obj).GetHashCode(); See this post for a usage of it. –  orad Aug 26 at 21:12
    
So great thank you, you save one or two hours of my life !!! –  Titwan Dec 3 at 18:57

The inclusion of your comparison class (or more specifically the AsEnumerable call you needed to use to get it to work) meant that the sorting logic went from being based on the database server to being on the database client (your application). This meant that your client now needs to retrieve and then process a larger number of records, which will always be less efficient that performing the lookup on the database where the approprate indexes can be used.

You should try to develop a where clause that satisfies your requirements instead, see Using an IEqualityComparer with a LINQ to Entities Except clause for more details.

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