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I have an array with this type of content

a/a/a/test134.html
a/a/a/test223.html
a/b/b/test37.html
a/b/test41.html
a/b/test44.html
a/b/test432.html
a/d/test978.html
a/test.html

I need to split it by "directories" so that I can send each array for a directory into a function (please see code sample).

a/a/a/test134.html
a/a/a/test223.html

a/b/b/test37.html

a/b/test41.html
a/b/test44.html
a/b/test432.html

a/d/test978.html

a/test.html

This is what I have so far but I feel theres lots of bugs especially on end and beginning cases and is not clean enough to my liking.

for(my $i = 0; $i < scalar(@arrayKeys); $i++)
{
    my($filename, $directory) = fileparse($arrayKeys[$i]);
    my $currDir = $directory;

    # $currDir ne $prevDir: takes care of changes in path
    # $i + 1 == scalar(@arrayKeys): accounts for last row to be purged
    if($currDir ne $prevDir || $i + 1 == scalar(@arrayKeys))
    {   
        # if last row we need to push it
        if($i + 1 == scalar(@arrayKeys))
        {
            push(@sectionArrayKeys, $arrayKeys[$i]);
        }

        # ensure for first entry run we don't output
        if ($prevDir ne "")
        {
            &output(\@sectionArrayKeys);
        }

        # Clear Array and start new batch
        @sectionArrayKeys = ();
        push(@sectionArrayKeys, $arrayKeys[$i]);        
    }
    else
    {
        push(@sectionArrayKeys, $arrayKeys[$i]);        
    }

    $prevDir = $currDir;
}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your script is confusing, but from what I understand, you want to split the array of paths into new arrays, depending on their path. Well, easiest way to keep them apart is using a hash, like so:

use warnings;
use strict;

my %dir_arrays;

while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    if (m{^(.+/)([^/]+)$}) {
        push @{$dir_arrays{$1}}, $_; # or use $2 for just filename
    }
}

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper \%dir_arrays;

__DATA__
a/a/a/test134.html
a/a/a/test223.html
a/b/b/test37.html
a/b/test41.html
a/b/test44.html
a/b/test432.html
a/d/test978.html
a/test.html

Output:

$VAR1 = {
          'a/b/' => [
                      'a/b/test41.html',
                      'a/b/test44.html',
                      'a/b/test432.html'
                    ],
          'a/d/' => [
                      'a/d/test978.html'
                    ],
          'a/b/b/' => [
                        'a/b/b/test37.html'
                      ],
          'a/a/a/' => [
                        'a/a/a/test134.html',
                        'a/a/a/test223.html'
                      ],
          'a/' => [
                    'a/test.html'
                  ]
        };

Now, to send these arrays to a function, do something like this:

for my $key (keys %dir_arrays) {
    my_function($dir_arrays{$key}); # this sends an array reference
}

If you prefer to send an array instead of an array reference, just dereference it:

my_function(@{$dir_arrays{$key}});

Edit: Changed the script to store the full path, as it was more in line with the wanted output in the question.

share|improve this answer
    
wow TLP thanks alot that's a great way! One little detail I did not mention for sake of simplicity but am having issues integrating with your sample is that I was actually for each line storing a "value" in another array. I have two arrays, one for the full path and one for the status as in "pass, fail" :( So I need to use one multidimensional array I suppose –  user391986 Jul 14 '11 at 15:00
    
I'm not quite sure what you are referring to. If you mean whether each path passed or failed (in some other place), you can simply use another hash, such as: $passed{$path} = 0, using the full path as a key. –  TLP Jul 14 '11 at 15:07
1  
Nicely put, @TLP. I might suggest File::Basename for splitting the paths instead of a regexp, though. For example, push @{$dir_arrays{dirname($_)}}, $_; # or ..., basename($_). (And a use File::Basename; to make these available.) –  DCharness Jul 14 '11 at 17:35
    
@DCh Sounds like a good idea, I am not familiar with that module, though. –  TLP Jul 14 '11 at 17:53
1  
@TLP perldoc File::Basename gives details. If you're familiar with the basename and dirname Linux/Unix commands or POSIX C functions, the module supplies routines of the same names that work as similarly as possible to their namesakes. Roughly speaking, though, basename($filename) gives the part after the last / in the filename and dirname($filename) gives the part before. I suggest them over the regexp because they inherently document (especially for someone familiar with the names) the intent. –  DCharness Jul 15 '11 at 0:36
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