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Edit: Thank you for the answers. I am currently working on it!!\

I have 3 methods, S() returns string, D() returns double and B() returns bool.

I also have a variable that decides which method I use. I want do this:

    // I tried Func<object> method; but it says D() and B() don't return object.
    // Is there a way to use Delegate method; ? That gives me an eror saying method group is not type System.Delegate
    var method;

    var choice = "D";

    if(choice=="D")
    {
        method = D;
    }
    else if(choice=="B")
    {
        method = B;
    }
    else if(choice=="S")
    {
        method = S;
    }
    else return;

    DoSomething(method); // call another method using the method as a delegate.

    // or instead of calling another method, I want to do:
    for(int i = 0; i < 20; i++){
       SomeArray[i] = method();
    }

Is this possible?

I read this post: Storing a Method as a Member Variable of a Class in C# But I need to store methods with different return types...

share|improve this question
    
I'm interested, why do you want to pass around a method instead of declaring it in a scope that you can access on-demand? –  George Johnston Jul 14 '11 at 15:14
    
Actually, the methods I need are static so they can be accessed. It's just I need to choose one to use depending on the value in choice, without doing the if-elseif check on choice every time through a loop. –  Yuf Jul 14 '11 at 15:16
    
You need to actually declare a delegate. This will allow you to essentially simulate function pointers in C# as you'd find them in C or C++. –  Cody Gray Jul 14 '11 at 15:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Well, you could do:

Delegate method;

...
if (choice == "D") // Consider using a switch...
{
    method = (Func<double>) D;
}

Then DoSomething would be declared as just Delegate, which isn't terribly nice.

Another alternative would be to wrap the method in a delegate which just performs whatever conversion is required to get the return value as object:

Func<object> method;


...
if (choice == "D") // Consider using a switch...
{
    method = BuildMethod(D);
}

...

// Wrap an existing delegate in another one
static Func<object> BuildMethod<T>(Func<T> func)
{
    return () => func();
}
share|improve this answer
    
cool, cool beans –  gangelo Jul 14 '11 at 15:28
1  
Nice solution. You could also constrain BuildMethod to take only a value type as T, since a method that returns a reference type will be assignable to Func<object> already via a covariant method-group-to-delegate conversion. –  Eric Lippert Jul 14 '11 at 15:43
    
+1 @Eric for "I would not have thought of that." –  Greg D Jul 14 '11 at 15:59
    
@Eric: Except for method returning a nullable value type, which would neither satisfy a where T : struct constraint, nor work with generic covariance ;) –  Jon Skeet Jul 14 '11 at 16:17
2  
@Eric: I'll confess it wasn't the reason for not including a constraint to start with... but it sounds good after the fact :) –  Jon Skeet Jul 14 '11 at 16:19
Func<object> method;

var choice = "D";

if(choice=="D")
{
    method = () => (object)D;
}
else if(choice=="B")
{
    method = () => (object)B;
}
else if(choice=="S")
{
    method = () => (object)S;
}
else return;

DoSomething(method); // call another method using the method as a delegate.

// or instead of calling another method, I want to do:
for(int i = 0; i < 20; i++){
   SomeArray[i] = method();
}
share|improve this answer
private delegate int MyDelegate();
private MyDelegate method;


    var choice = "D";

    if(choice=="D")
    {
        method = D;
    }
    else if(choice=="B")
    {
        method = B;
    }
    else if(choice=="S")
    {
        method = S;
    }
    else return;

    DoSomething(method); 
share|improve this answer
    
The methods don't return int, so this won't compile. Also, why do you declare your own version of Func<int>? –  svick Jul 14 '11 at 17:40

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