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Below is a code sample presenting the design of a Windows form I use in a Windows CE application.

We are having some unresolved problems in our application, and I suspect that the problem comes from the thread used here as background worker (since the class BackgroundWorker is not available in Windows CE).

You can see that a lock object is used to prevent multiple instances of MyWorker.

Is it the right way to prevent multiple instances of such "worker"? Would it work as expected? Would a singleton worker be better?

public class MainForm : Form {
    private object myLock = new Object();
    private bool isWorkerStarted = false;

    private Thread worker;

    public MainForm() {
    }

    public void btn_Click() {
        lock(myLock) {
            if(!isWorkerStarted) {
                MyWorker worker = new MyWorker();
                worker.StartEvent  = new EventHandler(ThreadStart);
                worker.EndEvent = new EventHandler(ThreadStop);
                workerThread = new Thread(worker.DoWork);

                workerThread.Start();

                isWorkerStarted = true;
            }
        }
    }

    public void ThreadStart(object sender, EventArgs args) {
        lock(myLock) {
            isWorkerStarted = true;
            // Invoke some delegate to interact with the window
        }
    }

    public void ThreadStop(object sender, EventArgs args) {
       lock(mylock) {
           isWorkerThread = false;
       }

       this.Invoke(new NewFormDelegate(OpenForm));
    }

    private void OpenForm() {
       AnotherWindowForm awf = new AnotherWindowForm();
       awf.Show();
       this.Close();
    }

    //******************
    // Worker class
    //******************
    public class MyWorker() {
        public event EventHandler StartEvent;

        public void OnStart() {
            if(StartEvent != null) {
                    StartEvent(this, new EventArgs());
            }
        }

        // Edit 2011-07-19
        public void OnEnd() {
           if(EndEvent != null) {
                    EndEvent(this, new EventArgs());
           }
        }

        public void DoWork() {
            OnStart();
            // Do some work.
            OnEnd();
        }
    }

}

Edit 2011-07-19 Here are more details about the goal of the project.

We have a Windows form with only one button on a Windows CE device. When the user clicks on the button, a worker thread must be started requesting a WCF service. During the execution of the thread, the little hourglass indicates to the user that the program is busy. When the worker is done (i.e. when he receives a "good" answer), it must stops and open another Windows form on the top of the current one (for that purpose I'm using the method Invoke to delegate the creation of the new form).

The only requirement is that the user should not be able to run two workers (for example by clicking two times on the button). And the facts are that sometimes, we can see that two workers are making requests to the WCF service from the same device.

share|improve this question
    
You haven't said what problem you're having. Also, the C# programming language has no constructs specific to threading. You're actually asking about .NET threading, not C# threading. –  John Saunders Jul 14 '11 at 15:19
    
The problem is a little bit hard to explain with only a sample of code since the whole application uses WCF which can potentially be the source of our problem. The goal of this post is to be sure that this part of the code is "safe". And I changed the title. –  Goulutor Jul 14 '11 at 15:28
    
I mean you haven't told us what problem you're trying to solve. –  John Saunders Jul 14 '11 at 15:39
    
The main problem is that it seems that more than one worker can run at the same time when the user clicks on the button, but we are expecting only one worker... –  Goulutor Jul 15 '11 at 7:25

2 Answers 2

I would not use lock() in this case. If the background worker is already running, the main GUI thread will sit on that lock until the other thread has finished.

I would recommend instead using a Mutex. This way you can set it to automatically skip over the section if it's already locked.

So you should do something like:

Mutex mtx = new Mutex();

public void btn_Click() {
   if ( mtx.WaitOne(0) == true )
   { 
       //Do your stuff
   }
   else
   {
       //Let user know you can't do this yet?  Or, queue it up?  Or, why 
       // can the user click this button if they can't do anything anyway?
   }
}

You'll need to do a mtx.Release() whenever your thread is done doing its stuff.

share|improve this answer
    
The lock will not block the UI if it used correctly, as it should only be necessary for preventing race conditions with the setting of the isWorkerStarted flag. The real issue is that the thread acquires and holds the lock, when it should not actually need to do so. –  Dan Bryant Jul 14 '11 at 15:28
    
Well, yup, that's true now that I look back at it. If he just moved that '// Invoke some delegate to interact with the window' outside of the lock it should be fine. I completely missed the isWorkerStarted bool for some reason, and thought he was using the lock for keeping multiple instances running. Oh well, mine'll work too! :) –  DanTheMan Jul 14 '11 at 15:33
    
You can also use the existing SyncBlock (the implementation mechanism for the lock statement) to implement this pattern, as there is a Monitor.TryEnter method. The tricky thing is making sure that you always release the lock if you are able to acquire it. I believe this is slightly lighter-weight than Mutex, though Mutex should work fine too. –  Dan Bryant Jul 14 '11 at 15:40
    
Mutex is for interprocess synchronization so the Monitor should be used here. –  mgronber Jul 15 '11 at 12:54

You don't need to use a lock here at all as the btn_Click method will only be called by the UI thread (unless you explicitly call it from another thread which would be bad).

So the code only needs a null check to ensure you only have one worker thread created.

public class MainForm : Form
{
    private Thread workerThread = null;

    public MainForm()
    { }

    public void btn_Click()
    {
        if (workerThread == null)
        {
            var worker = new MyWorker();
            worker.StartEvent += (s, e) =>
            {
                //Invoke some delegate to interact with the window
            };
            workerThread = new Thread(worker.DoWork);
            workerThread.Start();   
        }
    }
}

EDIT: In response to a comment from the OP.

public class MainForm : Form
{
    private Thread workerThread = null;

    public MainForm()
    { }

    public void btn_Click()
    {
        if (workerThread == null || workerThread.IsAlive == false)
        {
            var worker = new MyWorker();
            worker.StartEvent += (s, e) =>
            {
                //Invoke some delegate to interact with the window
            };
            worker.EndEvent += (s, e) =>
            {
                //Clean up
            };
            workerThread = new Thread(worker.DoWork);
            workerThread.Start();   
        }
    }
}

And MyWorker now looks like this:

public class MyWorker
{
    public event EventHandler StartEvent;
    public event EventHandler EndEvent;

    public void OnStart()
    {
        var se = this.StartEvent;
        if (se != null)
        {
            se(this, new EventArgs());
        }
    }

    public void OnEnd()
    {
        var ee = this.EndEvent;
        if (ee != null)
        {
            ee(this, new EventArgs());
        }
    }

    public void DoWork()
    {          
            this.OnStart();
            // do some work
            this.OnEnd();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
With your solution, how can I check that the worker has finished its job, since I want to be able to create another worker after that? –  Goulutor Jul 15 '11 at 7:27
    
@Goulutor - your original code didn't have any way of checking when the thread had finished and you said in your question you didn't want multiple instances of the worker. I had the feeling that your question wasn't quite "code complete". Give me a tick and I'll edit my solution. –  Enigmativity Jul 15 '11 at 9:41
    
I'm using the Compact Framework (on Windows CE), therefore the property IsAlive doesn't exist for the class Thread. –  Goulutor Jul 18 '11 at 13:10
    
@Goulutor - then you could set workerThread to null in the EndEvent event handler rather than use IsAlive. Would that work for you? –  Enigmativity Jul 19 '11 at 5:09

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