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I have a php function that generates HTML code like below

function j_uf_SomeFunction($some_var) {
    ?><div class="db_photo">
        <img alt="<?php echo some_php_function ?>" src="<?php echo $some_var; ?>" />
    </div><?php
}

Of course, its much more advanced and add all sorts of user options.

In most case I place this function inline, as opposed to have to append it to a string. However, I've come to the first occurrence (probably not the last occurrence) where I need to store the rendered HTML in a string and not have it sent straight off to the parser for building the page.

I need to cut the function off and tell it to take the html generated and store it in a string, and not send it off to the page, only on certain situations.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
function j_uf_SomeFunction($some_var) {
    ob_start();
    ?><div class="db_photo">
        <img alt="<?php echo some_php_function ?>" src="<?php echo $some_var; ?>" />
    </div><?php
  return ob_get_clean();//suggestion by GWW
}

ob_start() is starting buffer receive ob_get_clean() cleans current buffer and returns its value.

More info on http://php.net/manual/en/function.ob-start.php

ob * output buffering

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because it hasn't been explicitly said, this is called "output buffering", hence the ob. –  zzzzBov Jul 14 '11 at 15:58
    
+1, (edit: nevermind im wrong) –  Rob Jul 14 '11 at 15:59
    
yes, thanks for appending info... :) –  Senad Meškin Jul 14 '11 at 15:59
    
Can I do this as I call the function like ob_start(); j_uf_SomeFunction('blah'); $html = ob_end_clean(); –  Justin Jul 14 '11 at 16:00
    
I hav just updated code, one minor mistake, and yes you can do it your way –  Senad Meškin Jul 14 '11 at 16:02

It sounds like output buffers are one possible solution to your problem.

You use an output buffer like so:

ob_start();
j_uf_SomeFunction($someVar);
$buffer = ob_get_contents();
ob_end_clean();

The $buffer variable now contains anything printed out by the function.

It's important to always close output buffers with ob_end_clean or ob_end_flush. You can read more here: http://php.net/manual/en/book.outcontrol.php

Regards, Chris

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Thank you, so I should use ob_end_flush at the end of clean? –  Justin Jul 14 '11 at 16:28
    
It's not necessary and could cause a warning. ob_end_clean clears the output buffer you start with ob_start, whereas ob_end_flush prints what's in the output buffer before emptying it. You either use one or the other :-) –  cgwyllie Jul 14 '11 at 17:54

I don't I have a template system to parse this functions value into... its not your standard function call.

sure you do... its jsut contained within the function :-)

using translation:

function j_uf_SomeFunction($some_var) {
    $html = "<div class="db_photo"><img alt="%some_function_result%" src="%some_var%" /></div>";
    $tokens = array(
      '%some_var%' => $some_var,
      '%some_function_call_result%' => some_function_call()
    );

    return strtr($html, $tokens); // or echo
}

using string manipulation:

function j_uf_SomeFunction($some_var) {
    $html = '<div class="db_photo"><img alt="%s" src="%s" /></div>';

    return sprintf($html, some_function_call(), $some_var); //or echo
}

if some_function_call actually outputs html directly with its own echo then jsut use a buffer:

   function j_uf_SomeFunction($some_var) {
    ob_start();
    some_function_call();
    $somefunc = ob_get_clean();

    $html = '<div class="db_photo"><img alt="%s" src="%s" /></div>';
    return sprintf($html, $somefunc, $some_var); //or echo
}
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Great, now you'd like me to rewrite my entire web service... terrible people. Lol. –  Justin Jul 14 '11 at 18:20
    
I find it much easier to spit out context in html, for wire framing and to keep in standards. This is also why I like php as apposed to any other solution that wants me to manipulate the whole site from strings... I'm doing advanced data manipulation... If its still advisable, I suppose its better to stick with standards than not. –  Justin Jul 14 '11 at 18:22
    
P.S. The above function was just an example... The real function connects to a database and prints out the image. The function I'm calling this function from takes a string like "<div id="title">{{title}}</div><div id="post">{{image:{{urf}}}} {{post data}}</div>" and parses the {{}} commands for building a line item (stream post). This paritucluar one looks for {{image:x}} (using a regexpr) and calls the image grabber. The function that I based my example off of. Still Following? –  Justin Jul 14 '11 at 18:28

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