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I'm working on an exercise on the textbook "Operating System Concepts 7th Edition", and I'm a bit confused about how does fork() work. From my understanding, fork() creates a child process which runs concurrently with its parent. But then, how do we know exactly which process runs first? I meant the order of execution.

Problem
Write a C program using fork() system call that generates the Fibonacci sequence in the child process. The number of sequence will be provided in the command line.

This is my solution:

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

void display_fibonacci_sequence( int n ) {
    int i = 0;
    int a = 1;
    int b = 1;
    int value;
    printf( "%d, %d, ", a, b );
    for( ;i < n - 2; ++i ) {
        value = a + b;
        printf( "%d, ", value );
        a = b;
        b = value;
    }
    printf( "\n" );
}

int main( int argc, char** argv ) {
    int n;
    pid_t pid;
    pid = fork();
    if( argc != 2 ) {
        fprintf( stderr, "Invalid arguments" );
        exit( -1 );
    }
    n = atoi( argv[1] );

    if( pid < 0 ) {
        fprintf( stderr, "Fork failed" );
        exit( -1 );
    }
    else if( pid == 0 ) {
        display_fibonacci_sequence( n );
    }
    else { // parent process
        // what do we need to do here? 
    }
}

To be honest, I don't see any difference between using fork and not using fork. Besides, if I want the parent process to handle the input from user, and let the child process handle the display, how could I do that?

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Which process runs first is (I guess) up to the scheduler. If you are interested, fetch the (fine precision) clock time just after the fork() call and compare them. –  Karoly Horvath Jul 14 '11 at 17:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

We don't know which runs first, the parent or the child. This is why the parent generally has to wait for the child process to complete if there is some dependency on order of execution between them.

In your specific problem, there isn't any particular reason to use fork(). Your professor probably gave you this just for a trivial example.

If you want the parent to handle input and the child to calculate, all you have to do is move the call to fork() below the point at which you handle the command-line args. Using the same basic logic as above, have the child call display_fibonacci_sequence, and have the parent simply wait

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In fact, I'm teaching myself not tighting to any particular course. Still, the exercise from the book is weird. As for your answer, I don't understand why the parent have to wait? Should the input from user occur first? If the parent wait, then how do we feed the value for child process? Thank you. –  Chan Jul 14 '11 at 17:06
    
@Chan, if "the input from the user" refers to the command-line args, then those are processed by the shell before your program even runs. The child gets the value in exactly the same way it gets any other value: it has it in memory. When you call fork, the child process doesn't start over, but is rather a clone of the parent process, in exactly the same state and with exactly the same variables. So if the parent processes argv and puts the value into n, then the child has exactly the same value in n when it runs. –  JSBձոգչ Jul 14 '11 at 17:11
    
Thank you so much. I'm seeing it now. –  Chan Jul 14 '11 at 17:31

You are asking many questions, I'll try to answer them in a convenient order.

First question

To be honest, I don't see any difference between using fork and not using fork.

That's because the example is not a very good one. In your example the parent doesn't do anything so the fork is useless.

Second

else {
    // what do we need to do here? 
}

You need to wait(2) for the child to terminate. Make sure you read that page carefully.

Third

I want the parent process to handle the input from user, and let the child process handle the display

Read the input before the fork and "handle" the display inside if (pid == 0)

Fourth

But then, how do we know exactly which process runs first?

Very few programs should concern themselves with this. You can't know the order of execution, it's entirely dependent on the environment. TLPI says this:

After a fork(), it is indeterminate which process—the parent or the child—next has access to the CPU. On a multiprocessor system, they may both simultaneously get access to a CPU.

Applications that implicitly or explicitly rely on a particular sequence of execution in order to achieve correct results are open to failure due to race conditions

That said, an operating system can allow you to control this order. For instance, Linux has /proc/sys/kernel/sched_child_runs_first.

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Thanks a lot. Dunno why I'm feeling so dumb now :( –  Chan Jul 14 '11 at 17:09
2  
Upvoting since /proc/sys/kernel/sched_child_runs_first is a good thing to know about –  Evan Jul 14 '11 at 18:24

The process which is selected by your system scheduler is chosen to run, not unlike any other application running on your operating system. The process spawned is treated like any other process where the scheduler assigns a priority or spot in queue or whatever the implementation is.

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But then, how do we know exactly which process runs first? I meant the order of execution.

There is no guarantee to which one ran first. fork returns 0 if it is the child and the pid of the child if it is the parent. Theoretically they could run at exactly the same time on a multiprocessor system. If you actually wanted to determine which ran first you could have a shared lock between the two processes. The one that acquires the lock first could be said to have run first.

In terms of what to do in your else statement. You'll want to wait for the child process to exit using wait or waitpid.

To be honest, I don't see any difference between using fork and not using fork.

The difference is that you create a child process. Another process on the system doing computation. For this simple problem the end user experience is the same. But fork is very different when you are writing systems like servers that need to deal with things concurrently.

Besides, if I want the parent process to handle the input from user, and let the child process handle the display, how could I do that?

You appear to have that setup already. The parent process just needs to wait for the child process to finish. The child process will printf the results to the terminal. And the parent process currently gets user input from the command line.

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Thank you very much for the explanation. –  Chan Jul 14 '11 at 17:33

While you cannot control which process (parent or child) gets scheduled first after the fork (in fact on SMP/multicore it might be both!) there are many ways to synchronize the two processes, having one wait until the other reaches a certain point before it performs any nontrivial operations. One classic, extremely portable method is the following:

  1. Prior to fork, call pipe to create a pipe.
  2. Immediately after fork, the process that wants to wait should close the writing end of the pipe and call read on the reading end of the pipe.
  3. The other process should immediately close the reading end of the pipe, and wait to close the writing end of the pipe until it's ready to let the other process run. (read will then return 0 in the other process)
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