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Is there something like dOxygen/Javadoc? What has everyone used out there that has worked well?

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1  
possible duplicate of Javascript Standard Documentation Tool –  Brian Fisher Aug 22 '12 at 21:19
    
I implemented some of the JavaScript Document Generators [JSDoc, YUIDoc, Docco], here are some of my findings : markupjavascript.com/2014/02/… –  Mandeep Pasbola Feb 24 at 15:00
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17 Answers

up vote 40 down vote accepted

The 800-pound gorilla of Javascript documentation is the JSDoc Toolkit and its successor JSDoc 3. Most of the documentation is done with Javadoc-like tags and a /** comment prefix.

Example:

var MyClass = Class.create(
  /** @lends MyClass# */              // @lends is how you document anonymous classes.
  {
    /**
     * Description of constructor.
     * @class Description of class.   // @class annotation goes anywhere and
     *                                //   describes the whole class.
     * @constructs                    // This is a constructor.
     */
    initialize: function(arg0, arg1) {
      //...
    },

    /** A method. */
    myFunc: function() {},

    /** An instance field. */
    myVar: 123
  }
);

Object.extend(MyClass,
  /** @lends MyClass */
  {
    /** A class method. */
    classFunc: function() {}
  }
);
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"As of 27 June 2010 the JsDoc Toolkit Version 2 project is no longer accepting any new Feature Request tickets. Any Feature Request tickets submitted after that date will be deleted without comment." There was only one change in 2012, and one change in 2011. Is it so mature that it doesn't need new changes, or is it essentially a dead project? –  Daniel Yankowsky Dec 27 '12 at 4:34
2  
Nevermind, a friend pointed me toward JSDoc 3 on GitHub. –  Daniel Yankowsky Dec 27 '12 at 4:44
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I added the JSDoc 3 link, hope you don't mind. –  Tim Büthe Feb 27 '13 at 13:30
    
@TimBüthe Not at all. –  John Feminella Mar 1 '13 at 14:47
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There's also docco (or the Ruby version rocco) which produces really pretty HTML documentation in a two-column layout, with syntax highlighting thrown in. There's no strict rules for how your documentation must be structured; instead it parses regular comments. Markdown can be used to style your docs with lists, code examples, etc. I'm using it for both javascript and ruby at the moment, it's pretty neat.

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+1 for [dr]occo. The backbone.js project uses it for their annotated source for their todo list demo application, you can checkout the output here documentcloud.github.com/backbone/docs/todos.html –  Brian Wigginton Sep 19 '11 at 20:19
    
My initial reaction to the linked page is that it was confusing, but I'm probably just not used to the style. –  Daniel Yankowsky Dec 27 '12 at 4:31
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no /* your_foo */ style comments for docco... –  user656925 Jan 29 '13 at 21:51
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and pycco –  Shrikant Sharat Mar 19 '13 at 16:50
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No, not widely accepted, but ScriptDoc approach will seem familiar to you if you know Java documentation techniques using the JavaDoc tool, but it has not fully been accepted yet to industry.

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FYI in the link you provided there is no ScriptDoc, they say it's integrated into Aptana Studio now. It seems a bit complex to just do Javascript documentation. –  Marco Demaio Jun 2 '10 at 11:35
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Here's a link to the intended ScriptDoc –  Richard Ayotte Mar 29 '12 at 15:59
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You could also try NaturalDocs. I haven't actually used it myself, but it looks reasonable and supports many other languages as well as JavaScript (the full list of supported languages can be found here).

Steve

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Natural Docs requires PERL to work –  Marco Demaio Jun 2 '10 at 11:54
    
I used it to document a JavaScript library made of a couple of files and fould it pleasing. –  Ferdinand Prantl Mar 18 '12 at 15:41
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A little too verbose for my liking... but, YUI Doc seems to have some legs.

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YUI Doc requires PHYTON to work; –  Marco Demaio Jun 2 '10 at 11:55
    
Python dependency was removed in a recent version. –  lorefnon Jun 23 '12 at 5:10
    
One of the nice things about YUIDoc is that it runs on node.js, as opposed to JSDoc: "JSDoc 3 uses the Mozilla Rhino engine, which requires Java." - github.com/jsdoc3/jsdoc –  alanning Jan 4 '13 at 10:39
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JSDuck by the guys at Sencha is a pretty neat alternative, supporting stuff like images and video references (and seems to be somewhat compatible with JSDoc-Toolkit).

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There is JSDoc and the Ruby powered Pdoc. There's not really an accepted "standard" but JSDoc probably comes the closest.

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JSDoc requires PERL to work; –  Marco Demaio Jun 2 '10 at 11:57
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Personally, I'm a huge fan of Doxygen. While JavaScript isn't one of the officially supported languages, there is a helper script that's supposed to make it work. (I haven't tried Doxygen with JavaScript myself, but I did get it working on several hundred thousand lines of Delphi / Pascal code, and JavaScript must be easier.)

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You can also use the documentor created for ExtJS: http://code.google.com/p/ext-doc/.

Its amazing, with support for custom tags and fully templated output. It comes with a nice XSL sheet for transforming the output into something useful (the sample obviously converts to the ExtJS style of documentation).

I've used it in my projects with great success.

Check out the thread on it here: http://extjs.com/forum/showthread.php?t=55214

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Ext Doc creates heavy Ext-style documentation (not simpe, HTML/CSS documentation); –  Marco Demaio Jun 2 '10 at 11:55
    
Ext Doc uses an XSL stylesheet and templates; you can convert it to whatever you want. –  jvenema Jun 2 '10 at 12:00
    
Sencha has replaced this tool with JSDuck, see github.com/senchalabs/jsduck. –  James McMahon Jan 24 '13 at 15:51
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doxygen can do it through filter :

http://www.stack.nl/~dimitri/doxygen/helpers.html

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As described in this link:

There is another method that uses pseudo code in java syntax to document javascript..

  1. Use a script to get all pseudo code from .js files and generate .java files with the same name, the script is attached bellow named builddoc. This script actually get all lines begin with ‘///’, ‘/*’, ‘/ ‘, ‘ * ‘, ‘ /’ and ‘//’ into the .java file. So a javascript file like

    //* package ns;
    /**
    * Foo.
    * @param foo foo.
    */
    var foo=function(foo){}
    //* public void foo(String foo);
    

will be converted into

package ns;
/**
* Foo.
* @param foo foo.
*/
public void foo(String foo);

And now doxygen can process it in java way. You should use FILE_PATTERNS = *.java in your doxygen configuration to tell doxygen to parse all .java files.

builddoc:

#!/bin/bash

DIRs="./"

if [ $# -ne 0 ]
then
    DIRs=$@
fi

for DIR in $DIRs; do

    JSs=`find $DIR -name "*.js"`

    for JS in $JSs; do
    DOC=`echo $JS|sed 's/\(.*\)\.js/\1.java/g'`;
    if [ $JS -nt $DOC ]; then
        echo "rebuild $DOC"
        grep -e '^\s*\(///\|//\*\|/\*\*\| \* \| \*/\)' $JS | sed 's/^\s*\/\/\*\(.*\)$/\1/g'> $DOC
    fi
done

done
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Natural Docs seems to be fairly simple to use and seems to handle simple JS structures like classes,functions and constants. Doesnt seem to have too much support for anonymous functions and nested classes. @Marco Demaio: yes, Natural Docs requires perl, but its a 5 minute no-brainer installer to get perl running.You can get it at: http://www.activestate.com/activeperl/downloads

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No, unfortunately there is no standard.

There are, however, quite a few tools that do similar functions.

This wikipedia page covers these tools in depth. For our project we're using robodoc.

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I am surprised, that no one has mentioned the excellent API Documentation Generator from the DOJO Project:

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I use http://ortelius.marten.dk. Its pretty easy to instal and use (windows), which a GUI sucker like me likes :)

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If you're up to show your annotated source code, then it might be useful to take a look at ExplainJS.

In the homepage, you can submit the URL of one of your live codes and you will see the result immediately (pretty good to see the final result without installing, configuring, etc.)

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Using SmartComments you can comment your entire javascript project in less than one minute.

SmartComments, it’s a tool that allow you to create implicit comments from JavaScript source code.

You can use in the console or through of a Sublime Text Plugin.

Please go to http://smartcomments.github.io for further information.

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