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It's me and my BlockingQueue again... I rewrote it according to this article and this question. It sends some items and then crashes with an access violation. Here's the code:

template <typename T>
bool DRA::CommonCpp::CTBlockingQueue<T>::Push( T pNewValue ){
    volatile long oldSize;
    ::InterlockedExchange( &oldSize, m_Size );
    CTNode* pNewNode = new CTNode();
    pNewNode->m_pValue = pNewValue;
    {//RAII block
        CGuard g( m_TailCriticalSection );
        m_pTailNode->m_pNext = pNewNode;
        m_pTailNode = pNewNode;
        ::InterlockedIncrement( &m_Size );
    }
    if( oldSize == 0 )
        m_eAtLeastOneElement.set();
    return true;
}

template <typename T>
bool DRA::CommonCpp::CTBlockingQueue<T>::Pop( T& pValue ){
    CTNode* pCurrentNode;
    {//RAII block
        CGuard g( m_HeadCriticalSection );
        pCurrentNode = m_pHeadNode;
        CTNode* pNewHeadNode = m_pHeadNode->m_pNext;
        if( pNewHeadNode == NULL ){
            CEvent* pSignaledEvent;
            CEvent::waitForPair( m_eAtLeastOneElement, m_eFinished, pSignaledEvent );
            if( pSignaledEvent == &m_eFinished )
                return false;
            pNewHeadNode = m_pHeadNode->m_pNext;
        }
        pValue = pNewHeadNode->m_pValue;
        m_pHeadNode = pNewHeadNode;
        ::InterlockedDecrement( &m_Size );
    }
    delete pCurrentNode;
    return true;
}

It always crashes in a call to Pop(), in the line after the if, the one which says:

pValue = pNewHeadNode->m_pValue

It blows up cos' pNewHeadNode is NULL. But how can this happen?

Edit: Forgot initialization code:

template <typename T>
DRA::CommonCpp::CTBlockingQueue<T>::CTBlockingQueue():
        m_HeadCriticalSection("CTBlockingQueue<T>::m_Head"),
        m_TailCriticalSection("CTBlockingQueue<T>::m_Tail"){
    CTNode* pDummyNode = new CTNode();
    m_pHeadNode = pDummyNode;
    m_pTailNode = pDummyNode;
    m_Size = 0; //Dummy node doesn't count
}
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Why on earth you need interlocked increment/decrement when you have a mutex? –  user405725 Jul 14 '11 at 18:36
    
To ask for the queue size. I didn't post it, but there's a getter method for that –  dario_ramos Jul 14 '11 at 18:39
    
Wait, there's another, more important reason: to wake up pending Pop calls who blocked on an empty queue. See the final lines of Push() –  dario_ramos Jul 14 '11 at 18:45
    
You don't need that interlocked magic. You can get that size w/o interlocked operation inside the critical section that you hit anyway. –  user405725 Jul 14 '11 at 19:07
    
... and you crash because you don't check if pNewHeadNode is not NULL in case your queue is empty :) –  user405725 Jul 14 '11 at 19:09

2 Answers 2

My assumption would have to be the fact that the event is set outside of the critical section, meaning push could potentially notify the event twice. Have you tried with setting the event inside the critical section?

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I added the initialization code in my answer: I create a dummy node to avoid this scenario –  dario_ramos Jul 14 '11 at 18:17
    
I see, I've updated my answer with why m_pHeadNode is causing the exception. –  Chad Jul 14 '11 at 18:21
    
pCurrentNode is deleted after m_pHeadNode is changed to point somewhere else, I don't see a problem there –  dario_ramos Jul 14 '11 at 18:29
    
You're right, that isn't the problem. My answer is not correct. –  Chad Jul 14 '11 at 18:30
    
Edited again, this time with a stab in the dark :( –  Chad Jul 14 '11 at 18:41
up vote 0 down vote accepted

In the end, I went back to my original, less efficient implementation, the one I posted here, with the addition of a Finish() method so that the producer can signal the consumers to end elegantly, and a Restart() method to start producing again without destroying and recreating the queue:

//Template definitions
template<class Element>
DRA::CommonCpp::CTBlockingQueue<Element>::CTBlockingQueue( unsigned int maxSize ):
    m_csFinished( "CTBlockingQueue::m_csFinished" ),
    m_csQueue( "CTBlockingQueue::m_csQueue" ),
    m_semElementCount( 0, maxSize ),
    m_bFinished(false){
}

template<class Element>
DRA::CommonCpp::CTBlockingQueue<Element>::~CTBlockingQueue(){
    Finish();
}

template<class Element>
void DRA::CommonCpp::CTBlockingQueue<Element>::Push( Element newElement ){
    {//RAII block
        CGuard g( m_csQueue );
        m_Queue.push( newElement );
    }
    m_semElementCount.Signal();
}

template<class Element>
bool DRA::CommonCpp::CTBlockingQueue<Element>::Pop( Element& element ){
    m_semElementCount.Wait();
    {//RAII block
        CGuard g( m_csFinished );
        if( m_bFinished ){
            CGuard g( m_csQueue );
            if ( m_Queue.size() == 0 )
                return false;
        }
    }
    {//RAII block
        CGuard g( m_csQueue );
        element = m_Queue.front();
        m_Queue.pop();
    }
    return true;
}

template<class Element>
void DRA::CommonCpp::CTBlockingQueue<Element>::Finish(){
    {//RAII block
        CGuard g( m_csFinished );
        m_bFinished = true;
    }
    {//RAII block
        CGuard g( m_csQueue );
        m_semElementCount.Signal();
    }
}

template<class Element>
void DRA::CommonCpp::CTBlockingQueue<Element>::Restart(){
    {//RAII block
        CGuard g( m_csFinished );
        m_bFinished = false;
    }
}

This ain't the fastest way to go, but works fast enough for me.

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