Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This is an interview question:-

Write a C program which when compiled and run, prints out a message indicating whether the compiler that it is compiled with, allows /* */ comments to nest.

The solution to this problem is given below :-

Sol:- you can have an integer variable nest:

int nest = /*/*/0*/**/1;

if it supports nested comments then the answer is 1 else answer is 0.

How is this working ? I don't understand the variable declaration.

share|improve this question
up vote 20 down vote accepted

If the compiler doesn't allow nesting, the first */ will terminate the opening of the multiline comment, meaning the 0 won't be commented out. Written with some spaces:

int nest = /*/*/ 0 * /**/ 1;

resulting in the code

int nest = 0 * 1; // -> 0

If it allows nesting, it will be

int nest = /*/*/0*/**/ 1;

resulting in

int nest = 1;
share|improve this answer
    
Oh well, I'm too late. :) – Leonard Jul 14 '11 at 18:26
    
got it.........thanks – Pritpal Jul 14 '11 at 18:27
    
It's not necessarily the last ever */ in the file that would terminate it if it supported nesting. If that were the case then /**/0*1/**/ would not register as 0*1, but rather as a comment. With or without nesting the compiler should see this as 0*1 – redbmk Jul 14 '11 at 19:17

The short answer to "how is this working" is that:

int nest = /*/*/0*/**/1;

with nested comments becomes something like:

int nest = 
// /* (comment level 1) 
//    /*/ (comment level 2) 
//         0
//    */*
// */
1;

and without, the extra * makes it:

int nest = 
// /*/ (comment level 1) 
// */
        0
    *
// /*
// */
1;

or 0*1.

Or, I think that's what's happening, but this question is pretty much a disaster. I entirely agree with Blagovest Buyukliev's comment.

share|improve this answer

If it supports nested comments, then you'll have (Stripping the comments):

int nest = 1;

If it does not, then you'll have (Stripping the comments):

int nest = 0 * 1;
share|improve this answer
int nest = /*/*/0*/**/1;

Nesting not allowed

If nesting is NOT allowed, the first comment's range is:

           vvvvv
int nest = /*/*/0*/**/1;

With that comment removed (gap left for readability - the C++ preprocessor substitutes a single space, not sure about C), the next comment seen is:

                  vvvv
int nest =      0*/**/1;

With that also removed:

int nest =      0*    1;

Nesting allowed

Below, the |+- line shows the scope of the outer comment, and vvvvvv indicates teh scope of the inner comment.

           +---------+
           |         |
           | vvvvvv  |
int nest = /*/*/0*/**/1;

With those comments removed:

int nest =            1;
share|improve this answer

That is a big bag of loathsome hurt. My guess is that the third / possibly cancels the second multi-line comment block, rendering the * after the zero a multiplication, hence:

/* */0 * /* */ 1 == 0 * 1 == 0 // ==> nested comments aren't supported.
share|improve this answer

If the compiler understands nested comments, it will just strip the /*/*/0*/**/ part and leave you with the int nest = 1.

Otherwise, it will see int nest = 0*1 and 0 * 1 == 0.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.