Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have class Dad with subclass Son. I'd like to create a subclass of Dad and a subclass of Son that overrides a method of Dad.

What would be the best way of doing this without repeating code? I can not modify Dad and Son.

Given...

public class Dad {

public void doSomething() {}

}

public class Son extends Dad {

}

...I'd like to create...

public class DadSubclass extends Dad {

@Overrides
public void doSomething() {        
    // My code 
}

}

public class SonSubclass extends Son {

@Overrides
public void doSomething() { 
    // My code 
}

}

...without repeating // My code.

The obvious solution would be to create a helper class and call it for both, but this is problematic if I want to call protected methods, and I'm not allowed to create the subclasses with the same package.

Is there a better solution?

share|improve this question
1  
I'd re-think your class hierarchy instead. If you're repeating code like that, it means there's something wrong with how you defined it. –  vanza Jul 14 '11 at 18:51
    
It really depends on the specifics... What members do you need access to, how much code is the same in the subclasses. Maybe look at the template method pattern - would depend on your situation though. –  Riaan Cornelius Jul 14 '11 at 18:51
    
@vanza Unfortunately the original classes are part of an existing library. The Android SDK, in particular. –  hpique Jul 14 '11 at 18:53
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Create a common helper class and call it.

share|improve this answer
    
It gets a bit tricky if I want to call protected methods inside doSomething() and I'm not allowed to create the subclasses with the same package. –  hpique Jul 14 '11 at 18:50
    
@hgpc - you'll unfortunately have to pass the result of protected functions to the utility class, I don't think there's another way –  dfb Jul 14 '11 at 18:53
    
You could pass an instance of "this" that has proxy methods for the protected methods. –  JustinKSU Jul 14 '11 at 20:03
add comment

Assuming your code isn't accessing member variables, I would just put this code in a static utility class. If this isn't the case, you can still do this by passing in a common superclass - that of 'Dad' public static void mycode(Dad d). If you need specific variables in the subclasses themselves, I would rethink your class structure.

share|improve this answer
    
@vanza Unfortunately the original classes are part of an existing library (Android) and I can't change them. –  hpique Jul 14 '11 at 18:54
add comment

What you really want here is something like this:

class DadSonSubclass extends Dad, Son {
    public void doSomething() {
        //mycode
    }
}

This is multiple inheritance, which is not supported by Java. So your only option would be to create a helper/utility class, which is perfectly acceptable. If you need to call protected methods, just pass the Dad object in to the helper class and create public callback methods to access this info.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Maybe better, maybe not, depending on your point of view, but it can certainly be done. Put your code into a helper class, and use a callback to give that helper access to the protected methods it needs:

interface Callback {
    void foo();
    void bar();
    void one();
    void two();
}

class Helper {
    static void helpMe(Callback callback) {
        // My code
    }
}

class DadSubclass extends Dad {
    @Override
    public void doSomething() {
        Helper.helpMe(new Callback() {
            public void foo() {
                DadSubclass.this.foo();
            }

            public void bar() {
                DadSubclass.this.bar();
            }

            public void one() {
                throw new UnsupportedOperationException("one() doesn't exist in Dad");
            }

            public void two() {
                throw new UnsupportedOperationException("two() doesn't exist in Dad");
            }
        });
    }
}

class SonSubclass extends Son {
    @Override
    public void doSomething() {
        Helper.helpMe(new Callback() {
            public void foo() {
                SonSubclass.this.foo();
            }

            public void bar() {
                SonSubclass.this.bar();
            }

            public void one() {
                SonSubclass.this.one();
            }

            public void two() {
                SonSubclass.this.two();
            }
        });
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.