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Now similar question(s) has been asked at other places. However, I have tried the suggested solution(s) there and it did not help.

I am running following python CGI webserver:

#!/usr/bin/python
from BaseHTTPServer import HTTPServer
from CGIHTTPServer import CGIHTTPRequestHandler
serve = HTTPServer(("",80),CGIHTTPRequestHandler)
serve.serve_forever()

In the "cgi-bin" directory, following php file "simple.php" is stored:

 #!/usr/bin/php
 <html>
 <head>
 <title>PHP Test</title>
 </head>
 <body>
 <?php echo '<p>Hello World</p>'; ?> 
 </body>
 </html>

This file has been given executable permission and executes properly from just the commandline on the server.

Now if I start the server and try to access the page using "http://server/cgi-bin/simple.php", I get just a blank page and I don't see any error on the server stdout.

I looked through the code for CGIHTTPServer.py and I think the problem might be occurring when a process is forked to execute the cgi-bin and the file descriptors (stdin,stdout) are manipulated using dup2. However, I don't know how to get it working. This simple thing has been puzzling me for a few hours and would really appreciate any kind of help.

The server machine is a ubuntu 9.04 box.

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4  
I think you're missing a crucial piece in your question, which is that the CGIHTTPServer doesn't know how to run php code directly. Under Apache, PHP code is handled by mod_php. You'll need to add some glue code to get this to work. –  CraigM Jul 14 '11 at 19:08
    
I think CGIHTTPServer does know how to run the php code directly. Here is what I did. I put the os.execve() call before the fork in the CGIHTTPServer. And what I saw was it outputted "Hello world" on the command line and the webserver terminated (obviously). So the CGIHTTPServer is executing the php script –  Methos Jul 15 '11 at 13:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

#!/usr/bin/php doesn't make your script run as a CGI; it makes it run as a command-line script. If you have a php-cgi binary sitting around, use that instead; otherwise, you may have to hack something nasty into the script like:

#!/usr/bin/php
Content-Type: text/html

<html>
<head>
<title>PHP Test</title>
</head>
<body>
<?php echo '<p>Hello World</p>'; ?> 
</body>
</html>
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I am not sure I understand you. Are you saying that the python code in CGIHTTPServer cannot execute the php script? Here is what I did in CGIHTTPServer. Instead of execing the script after the fork, I put the os.execve() call before the fork. And what I saw was it outputted "Hello world" on the command line and the webserver terminated (obviously). So the CGIHTTPServer is executing the php script. –  Methos Jul 15 '11 at 13:50
    
I'm... not sure what that's supposed to prove. The issue at hand is simply that /usr/bin/php doesn't function as a CGI script, which is what CGIHTTPServer needs (hence the name). –  duskwuff Jul 15 '11 at 15:31
    
my point is - CGI server is just a fancy name. Underneath, all that code is doing is forking a process and executing a CGI script. The output of that script is redirected to the socket that is connected to the client's browser. Thus the output of the CGI script should directly go to the browser. Hence if the python code can execute that script (which it can) then there should not be any problem. –  Methos Jul 15 '11 at 15:58
1  
Right. And the script must output HTTP headers as well as content. –  duskwuff Jul 15 '11 at 16:25
    
yup, you are right. It worked finally. I was being silly. –  Methos Jul 15 '11 at 16:36

USE: handler.cgi_directories.append('/')

Otherwise your cgi scripts will be executed ONLY if they are '/cgi-bin' or '/htbin' folders as described Here. Basically cgi_directories means to execute cgi from that folder and all subfolders. Hope that helped

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