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Here's a loop that I've tried with std::vector and with plain old double*. For 10 million elements, the vector version consistently runs in about 80% of the time that the double* version takes; for pretty much any value of N, vector is notably faster. Peeking at the GCC STL source code, I don't see that std::vector is doing anything essentially fancier than what the double* idiom is doing (i.e., allocate with plain old new[], operator[] dereferences an offset). This question speaks to that, too. Any ideas why the vector version is faster?

Compiler: GCC 4.6.1
Example compile line: g++ -Ofast -march=native -DNDEBUG -ftree-vectorizer-verbose=2 -o vector.bin vector.cpp -lrt
OS: CentOS 5
CPU: Opteron 8431
RAM: 128 GB

Results are qualitatively the same if I use icpc 11.1 or run on a Xeon. Also, the vectorizer dump says that only the fill operation in std::vector's constructor was vectorized.

The vector version:

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>
#include "util.h"
#include "rkck_params.h"

using namespace std;

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    const size_t N = boost::lexical_cast<size_t>( argv[ 1 ] );

    vector<double> y_old( N );
    vector<double> y_new( N );
    vector<double> y_err( N );
    vector<double> k0( N );
    vector<double> k1( N );
    vector<double> k2( N );
    vector<double> k3( N );
    vector<double> k4( N );
    vector<double> k5( N );

    const double h = 0.5;

    const timespec start = clock_tick();
    for ( size_t i = 0 ; i < N ; ++i )
    {
        y_new[ i ] =   y_old[ i ]
                     + h
                      *(
                           rkck::c[ 0 ]*k0[ i ]
                         + rkck::c[ 2 ]*k2[ i ]
                         + rkck::c[ 3 ]*k3[ i ]
                         + rkck::c[ 5 ]*k5[ i ]
                       );
        y_err[ i ] =  h
                     *(
                          rkck::cdiff[ 0 ]*k0[ i ]
                        + rkck::cdiff[ 2 ]*k2[ i ]
                        + rkck::cdiff[ 3 ]*k3[ i ]
                        + rkck::cdiff[ 4 ]*k4[ i ]
                        + rkck::cdiff[ 5 ]*k5[ i ]
                      );
    }
    const timespec stop = clock_tick();
    const double total_time = seconds( start, stop );

    // Output
    cout << "vector\t" << N << "\t" << total_time << endl;

    return 0;
}

The double* version:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>
#include "util.h"
#include "rkck_params.h"

using namespace std;

int main( int argc, char* argv[] )
{
    const size_t N = boost::lexical_cast<size_t>( argv[ 1 ] );

    double* y_old = new double[ N ];
    double* y_new = new double[ N ];
    double* y_err = new double[ N ];
    double* k0 = new double[ N ];
    double* k1 = new double[ N ];
    double* k2 = new double[ N ];
    double* k3 = new double[ N ];
    double* k4 = new double[ N ];
    double* k5 = new double[ N ];

    const double h = 0.5;

    const timespec start = clock_tick();
    for ( size_t i = 0 ; i < N ; ++i )
    {
        y_new[ i ]
            =   y_old[ i ]
              + h
               *(
                    rkck::c[ 0 ]*k0[ i ]
                  + rkck::c[ 2 ]*k2[ i ]
                  + rkck::c[ 3 ]*k3[ i ]
                  + rkck::c[ 5 ]*k5[ i ]
                );
        y_err[ i ]
            =  h
              *(
                   rkck::cdiff[ 0 ]*k0[ i ]
                 + rkck::cdiff[ 2 ]*k2[ i ]
                 + rkck::cdiff[ 3 ]*k3[ i ]
                 + rkck::cdiff[ 4 ]*k4[ i ]
                 + rkck::cdiff[ 5 ]*k5[ i ]
               );
    }
    const timespec stop = clock_tick();
    const double total_time = seconds( start, stop );

    delete [] y_old;
    delete [] y_new;
    delete [] y_err;
    delete [] k0;
    delete [] k1;
    delete [] k2;
    delete [] k3;
    delete [] k4;
    delete [] k5;

    // Output
    cout << "plain\t" << N << "\t" << total_time << endl;

    return 0;
}

rkck_params.h:

#ifndef RKCK_PARAMS_H
#define RKCK_PARAMS_H

namespace rkck
{

// C.f. $c_i$ in Ch. 16.2 of NR in C++, 2nd ed.
const double c[ 6 ]
    = { 37.0/378.0,
        0.0,
        250.0/621.0,
        125.0/594,
        0.0,
        512.0/1771.0 };

// C.f. $( c_i - c_i^* )$ in Ch. 16.2 of NR in C++, 2nd ed.
const double cdiff[ 6 ]
    = { c[ 0 ] - 2825.0/27648.0,
        c[ 1 ] - 0.0,
        c[ 2 ] - 18575.0/48384.0,
        c[ 3 ] - 13525.0/55296.0,
        c[ 4 ] - 277.0/14336.0,
        c[ 5 ] - 1.0/4.0 };

}

#endif

util.h:

#ifndef UTIL_H
#define UTIL_H

#include <time.h>
#include <utility>

inline timespec clock_tick()
{
    timespec tick;
    clock_gettime( CLOCK_REALTIME, &tick );
    return tick;
}

// \cite{www.guyrutenberg.com/2007/09/22/profiling-code-using-clock_gettime}
inline double seconds( const timespec& earlier, const timespec& later )
{
    double seconds_diff = -1.0;
    double nano_diff = -1.0;

    if ( later.tv_nsec < earlier.tv_nsec )
    {
        seconds_diff = later.tv_sec - earlier.tv_sec - 1;
        nano_diff = ( 1.0e9 + later.tv_nsec - earlier.tv_nsec )*1.0e-9;
    }
    else
    {
        seconds_diff = later.tv_sec - earlier.tv_sec;
        nano_diff = ( later.tv_nsec - earlier.tv_nsec )*1.0e-9;
    }

    return seconds_diff + nano_diff;
}

#endif
share|improve this question
2  
    
@Martinho: I very much agree that realistic test cases for profiling are crucial if one's results are to have any hope of being meaningful. –  Hector Jul 14 '11 at 19:44
    
possible duplicate of std::vector is so much slower than plain arrays? –  Loki Astari Jul 14 '11 at 20:01
1  
@Martin: Isnt' that the opposite question? –  MSalters Jul 15 '11 at 8:20
    
@MSalters: I was assuming that people were smart enough to invert the question to get to the same answer. –  Loki Astari Jul 15 '11 at 15:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the vector version your data is initialized to zero. In the new version it's uninitialized, so different work might be done.

Did you run multiple times, in different orders?

share|improve this answer
    
sounds right: I reproduced OPs results on my system (vector was 50% faster), and changing all new[]s into new[]()s dropped the difference to 1 - 5%. –  Cubbi Jul 14 '11 at 19:46
    
Is the multiply instruction timing data-dependent? I thought that as it got faster over the years, it got more consistent as well. –  Mark Ransom Jul 14 '11 at 19:46
1  
@Mark Ransom It's not impossible that multiplying by zero could be a lot faster than multiplying by random numbers. –  Mark B Jul 14 '11 at 19:51
    
Initializing the arrays and vectors brings double*'s time down just under vector's, for me. I had forgotten that new[] on built-in types doesn't do any initialization. I would hypothesize that the vector(size_t) constructor running over all the vector elements brings them closer into memory (I don't know what I mean by that; maybe many are still in the cache?) than the initially untraversed double* arrays. –  Hector Jul 14 '11 at 20:00
1  
@Hector, you never said what value you're using for N but if it's small enough to fit in cache, "priming" the cache via initialization would definitely make it faster. Makes much more sense than my speculation about the multiply instruction. –  Mark Ransom Jul 14 '11 at 20:30

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