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I need to know how to make this ignore the number 0 when 0 is input so that the program does not exit when 0 is input.

#include <stdio.h>


int main()
{
    int input = 0, previous = 0;


    do {
        previous = input;
        printf("Input Number");
        scanf("%d", &input);
    } while( input!= previous*2 );

    return 0;
}
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Do you want it to never exit if they enter zero, or just not on the first try? It looks to me like it will exit the first time on 0, or later on if 0 is entered twice in a row –  redbmk Jul 14 '11 at 19:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
    #include <stdio.h>


int main()
{
    int input = 0, previous = 0;


    do {
        previous = input;
        printf("Input Number");
        scanf("%d", &input);
    } while( input == 0 || input!= previous*2 );

    return 0;
}

I added an OR operator, that means that if input is equal to 0, then it will still continue, but, if it is not 0, and the second condition is satisfied, it will break the loop and exit.

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Cool works great. I was looking up what the ! is and I kind of dont get what it is really for and also what is the two || lines for? Like how can I read the while line in maybe like a plain english way? –  papayrus Jul 14 '11 at 19:49
2  
@papayrus: You accepted an answer you don't understand? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 14 '11 at 20:06
    
while input equals 0 or(||) input is not equal to (previous times 2) –  Joe Jul 14 '11 at 20:06
    
|| means OR, pretty much. –  Dhaivat Pandya Jul 15 '11 at 6:08

Pick a different value for previous. Try INT_MAX >> 1 from limits.h.

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Or you could probably just get away with not initializing it. –  redbmk Jul 14 '11 at 19:41
    
redEvo: that's dangerous, some systems my initialize to 0 by default. –  Dhaivat Pandya Jul 15 '11 at 6:09
#include <stdio.h>


int main()
{
    int input = 0, previous = 0;

    do {
        previous = input;
        printf("Input Number");
        scanf("%d", &input);
    } while( input!= previous*2 || input==0);

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

while( input == 0 || input!= previous*2 ) in plain english this reads: while input equals zero or input is not equal to twice the previous. || is a logical or operation, and != (which was in your original code by the way) means not equal to.

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Thank you for that explanation helps alot. I thought == means equals to? –  papayrus Jul 16 '11 at 8:03
    
yes, you could write that same thing while input is equal to zero or input is not equal to twice the previous. so broken down: (input==0 [input is equal to zero] ||[or] inupt!=previous*2[input not equal to previous times 2] –  Irony Jul 18 '11 at 20:53

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