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I am comparing the performance of two atoi implementations. The first is iterating on the input string getting chars using charAt; the second is using foldLeft.

object Atoi {
  def withRandomAccess(str: String, baze: Int): Int = {
      def process(acc: Int, place: Int, str: String, index: Int): Int = 
        if (index >= 0) process(acc + value(str.charAt(index)) * place, place * baze, str, index-1) else acc
      process(0, 1, str, str.length - 1)
    }

  def withFoldLeft(str: String, base: Int): Int = (0/:str) (_ * base + value(_))

  def value(c: Char): Int = { /* omitted for clarity */ }

  def symbol(i: Int): Char = { /* omitted for clarity */ }
}

The foldLeft version is 2x to 4x slower (the complete benchmark code is here). I didn't expect this. Do you know why? Is Scala converting the string to a List before processing it? Do you have a hint on how to boost foldLeft performance on strings?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 19 down vote accepted

The issue is nothing to do with inlining, it is to do with the boxing/unboxing of Chars that is taking place when you use the foldLeft.

You get foldLeft on String by an implicit conversion to a StringOps, which is not specialized. Each char in the String has to be boxed into a java.lang.Character in order to be passed into the Function2 (argument to foldLeft), then unboxed (much cheaper) to be passed into the value method within the function body, then boxed again to be fed into the next iteration of the fold.

The boxing involves the overhead of creating objects and subsequently garbage-collecting them.


In terms of avoiding boxing, there follows a brief and important point:

  • you shouldn't attempt to avoid boxing, with a probability of almost 1.

(That is to say, unless you have identified a specific and unacceptable performance degradation which can be attributed to boxing, then you should not worry about it.)

If you are sure that there is an issue which you need to address, avoid the collections and for-comprehensions (which use foreach and flatMap under hood). If you are using a loop, use while.

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5  
+1, and this is one of the many performance considerations when using Scala. (Syntactic) sugar really is fattening :) –  opyate Jul 14 '11 at 20:08
    
I wonder to what extent specialization could be introduced to fix this type of problem. –  Kipton Barros Jul 14 '11 at 20:51
    
@Kipton - specialisation will only solve this when the collections library is specialised, which is a non-trivial undertaking –  oxbow_lakes Jul 14 '11 at 21:33
    
How can I modify my code to avoid the unnecessary boxing/unboxing? –  Sinbadsoft.com Jul 15 '11 at 7:44
1  
@Chaker - the first point I'd like to make is that you shouldn't, with a probability of almost 1. That is to say, unless you have identified a specific and unacceptable performance degradation which can be attributed to boxing, then you should not worry about it. If you are sure that there is an issue which you need to address, avoid the collections and for-comprehensions (which use foreach and flatMap under hood). If you are using a loop, use while –  oxbow_lakes Jul 15 '11 at 10:20

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