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I'm trying to implement Hanning and Hamming window functions in C#. I can't find any .Net samples anywhere and I'm not sure if my attempts at converting from C++ samples does the job well.

My problem is mainly that looking at the formulas I imagine they need to have the original number somewhere on the right hand side of the equation - I just don't get it from looking at the formulas. (My math isn't that good yet obviously.)

What I have so far:


public Complex[] Hamming(Complex[] iwv)
{
    Complex[] owv = new Complex[iwv.Length];
    double omega = 2.0 * Math.PI / (iwv.Length);

    // owv[i].Re = real number (raw wave data)
    // owv[i].Im = imaginary number (0 since it hasn't gone through FFT yet)
    for (int i = 1; i < owv.Length; i++)
        // Translated from c++ sample I found somewhere
        owv[i].Re = (0.54 - 0.46 * Math.Cos(omega * (i))) * iwv[i].Re; 

    return owv;

}

public Complex[] Hanning(Complex[] iwv)
{
    Complex[] owv = new Complex[iwv.Length];
    double omega = 2.0 * Math.PI / (iwv.Length);

    for (int i = 1; i < owv.Length; i++)
        owv[i].Re = (0.5  + (1 - Math.Cos((2d * Math.PI ) / (i -1)))); // Uhm... wrong

    return owv;
}
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Check out your loops - it simple skip first element in array 'owv[0]'. It must be: for (int i = 0; i < owv.Length; i++) – Vladislav Apr 4 '14 at 15:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's an example of a Hamming window in use in an open source C# application I wrote a while back. It's being used in a pitch detector for an autotune effect.

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Thanks. I've posted my results in my blog: blog.tedd.no/2011/07/15/hanning-hamming-window-functions-in-c – Tedd Hansen Jul 15 '11 at 9:05
    
One quick performance improvement you can use is to pre-calculate the window coefficients for every value of n, since that usually doesn't change during the lifetime of an application, and calls to Math.Sin/Cos are relatively slow. – Mark Heath Jul 15 '11 at 15:45

The operation of "windowing" means multiplying a signal by a window function. This code you found appears to generate the window function and scale the original signal. The equations are for just the window function itself, not the scaling.

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