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I've just started to use AutoMapper in my MVC 3 project and I'm wondering how people here structure their projects when using it. I've created a MapManager which simply has a SetupMaps method that I call in global.asax to create the initial map configurations. I also need to use a ValueResolver for one of my mappings. For me, this particular ValueResolver will be needed in a couple of different places and will simply return a value from Article.GenerateSlug.

So my questions are:

  1. How do you manage the initial creation of all of your maps (Mapper.CreateMap)?
  2. Where do you put the classes for your ValueResolvers in your project? Do you create subfolders under your Model folder or something else entirely?

Thanks for any help.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

i won't speak to question 2 as its really personal preference, but for 1 i generally use one or more AutoMapper.Profile to hold all my Mapper.CreateMap for a specific purpose (domaintoviewmodel, etc).

public class ViewModelToDomainAutomapperProfile : Profile
{
    public override string ProfileName
    {
        get
        {
            return "ViewModelToDomain";
        }
    }

    protected override void Configure()
    {
        CreateMap<TripRegistrationViewModel, TripRegistration>()
            .ForMember(x=>x.PingAttempts, y => y.Ignore())
            .ForMember(x=>x.PingResponses, y => y.Ignore());
    }
}

then i create a bootstrapper (IInitializer) that configures the Mapper, adding all of my profiles.

public class AutoMapperInitializer : IInitializer
{
    public void Execute()
    {
        Mapper.Initialize(x =>
                            {
                                x.AddProfile<DomainToViewModelAutomapperProfile>();
                                x.AddProfile<ViewModelToDomainAutomapperProfile>();
                            });
    }
}

then in my global.asax i get all instances of IInitializer and loop through them running Execute().

foreach (var initializer in ObjectFactory.GetAllInstances<IInitializer>())
            {
                initializer.Execute();
            }

that's my general strategy.


by request, here is the reflection implementation of the final step.

var iInitializer = typeof(IInitializer);

List<IInitializer> initializers = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies()
    .SelectMany(s => s.GetTypes())
    .Where(p => iInitializer.IsAssignableFrom(p) && p.IsClass)
    .Select(x => (IInitializer) Activator.CreateInstance(x)).ToList();

foreach (var initializer in initializers)
{
    initializer.Execute();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like the look of this. I do have one question though. I don't know what ObjectFactory.GetAllInstances is. From Googling, it seems to be a part of StructureMap. I've never used that so is there a .NET BCL equivalent of ObjectFactory.GetAllInstances? Thanks for the answer. :) –  John H Jul 15 '11 at 4:49
1  
if you're not using an ioc container, start. structuremap is what i use mostly, but there are others. i've updated my answer with the .net reflection way of doing things. its pretty simple. –  nathan gonzalez Jul 15 '11 at 5:31
    
Thanks a lot, Nathan! –  John H Jul 15 '11 at 16:34
1  
@johnh, no problem. be sure to use the IInitializer stuff for more than just automapper. think anything that you would normally put in the global.asax. otherwise the cost of reflection isn't really worth it. –  nathan gonzalez Jul 15 '11 at 20:48
    
Will do. I appreciate this sort of comment because I've still only been using MVC for a few weeks. –  John H Jul 16 '11 at 16:13

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