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I am trying to render a spaceship directly in front of a camera, with the model rotating with the camera's view. This works, as long as the player only yaws or rolls. If he does both, it goes into a tumble. A video of the problem is here: http://youtu.be/voKTsdy5TFY

The relevant code follows, edited for clarity:

D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&playeryaw, &up, yawangle);
D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&playerpitch, &right, pitchangle);

playerrot =  playeryaw * playerpitch;
D3DXMatrixTranslation(&playertrans, pos.x, pos.y, pos.z);
D3DXMatrixScaling(&playerscale, 0.05 / ((float)i + 1),  0.05 / ((float)i + 1),  0.05 / ((float)i + 1));
playercom = playerscale * playerrot *  playertrans;
device->SetTransform(D3DTS_WORLD, &playercom);
playermesh.render();

EDIT: Expanded code at the behest of Optillect Team.

share|improve this question
    
Could you give more code? E.g. translate matrix for the spaceship.. – Optillect Team Jul 14 '11 at 20:05
    
Here, have a code dump:D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&playeryaw, &up, yawangle); D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&playerpitch, &right, pitchangle); playerrot = playeryaw * playerpitch; D3DXMatrixTranslation(&playertrans, pos.x, pos.y, pos.z); D3DXMatrixScaling(&playerscale, 0.05 / ((float)i + 1), 0.05 / ((float)i + 1), 0.05 / ((float)i + 1)); playercom = playerscale * playerrot * playertrans; device->SetTransform(D3DTS_WORLD, &playercom); playermesh.render(); – Dahud Jul 14 '11 at 20:06
    
Wait, that's ugly. I'll put it in the main post. – Dahud Jul 14 '11 at 20:07

It seems you apply the same transform to the spaceship. You should:

  1. Apply rotation matricies to the spaceship, then translation matrix (position of the spaceship).
  2. Apply those matricies for up and right vectors.
  3. Build view (camera) matrix based on up and right vectors (first translate back of the spaceship, then rotate, then translate to the position of the spaceship)

Something like this:

    D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&shipyaw, &up, yawangle);
    D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&shippitch, &right, pitchangle);
    D3DXMatrixTranslate(&shippos, x, y, z);
    shipmatrix = shippitch * shipyaw * shippos;

    D3DXMatrixTranslate(&viewoffset, 0, 0, -10);
    D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&viewyaw, &up, -yawangle);
    D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&viewpitch, &right, -pitchangle);
    D3DXMatrixTranslate(&viewpos, -x, -y, -z);
    viewmatrix = viewoffset * viewpitch * viewyaw * viewpos;
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm. I implemented this just about the way you have it, changing a few variable names but otherwise making no alterations. Now the camera flings halfway across the map when I turn the ship. Did I implement it wrong? Split into multiple comments: – Dahud Jul 14 '11 at 20:52
    
D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&playeryaw, &up, yawangle); D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&playerpitch, &right, pitchangle); D3DXMatrixTranslation(&playertrans, pos.x, pos.y, pos.z); D3DXMatrixScaling(&playerscale, 0.05 / ((float)i + 1), 0.05 / ((float)i + 1), 0.05 / ((float)i + 1)); shipmatrix = playerscale * playeryaw * playerpitch * playertrans; – Dahud Jul 14 '11 at 20:54
    
D3DXMatrixTranslation(&viewoffset, 0, 0, -10); D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&viewyaw, &up, -yawangle); D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&viewpitch, &right, -pitchangle); D3DXMatrixTranslation(&viewpos, -pos.x, -pos.y, -pos.z); viewmatrix = viewoffset * viewpitch * viewyaw * viewpos; device->SetTransform(D3DTS_VIEW, &viewmatrix); device->SetTransform(D3DTS_WORLD, &shipmatrix); – Dahud Jul 14 '11 at 20:55
    
I admit, the code may not corrent, because I have not been using D3D for years :D But you should find the workaround this way. I'm not sure about those minus signs, may be the view matrix must be inverted.. – Optillect Team Jul 14 '11 at 21:04
    
I'll keep at it. Thanks. – Dahud Jul 14 '11 at 21:05

Na7coldwater may be right on the gimbal lock. The 2 angles you use, yawangle and pitchangle are euler angles and hence susceptible to gimble lock.

You could avoid gimbal lock by either using quaternions or by storing the current rotation and then build a delta rotation matrix and multiply to the previous rotation matrix.

ie where you build your rotation matrix you will be storing the delta from the previous rotation rather than the absoloute rotation from the model's origin state.

e.g

D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&playeryaw, &up, yawanglethisframe);
D3DXMatrixRotationAxis(&playerpitch, &right, pitchanglethisframe);

playerrot =  playerrot * (playeryaw * playerpitch); // This line has changed!!
D3DXMatrixTranslation(&playertrans, pos.x, pos.y, pos.z);
D3DXMatrixScaling(&playerscale, 0.05 / ((float)i + 1),  0.05 / ((float)i + 1),  0.05 / ((float)i + 1));
playercom = playerscale * playerrot *  playertrans;
device->SetTransform(D3DTS_WORLD, &playercom);
playermesh.render();

where playerrot is stored from frame to frame.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry to continue pestering you, but is there a possible bug with this method of the player model not showing up? I know that can happen if one of the matrices is out of whack. – Dahud Jul 15 '11 at 15:03
    
I was right. The playerrot matrix was initialized to 0, and multiplying by 0 had the expected results. This solution works perfectly. Thank you so very much. I have been bashing my head against this rock for 2 months now, and you solve it in a moment's thought. Now my question is why does adding the delta every frame make any difference? – Dahud Jul 15 '11 at 15:13
    
@Dahud: Because of Gimbal lock ;) – Goz Jul 15 '11 at 19:23
    
Sorry that's a slightly bizarre response but what you are suffering from is not understanding WHY gimbal lock occurs. I'll let you read up on it though because it would take a hell of a post to fully explain the issue. Basically it arises purely from generating a matrix using euler angles. If you asked the delta angles to move too much you'd STILL suffer gimbal lock. So the solution above is not perfect but, in general, it will do the job well :) – Goz Jul 15 '11 at 19:27

That looks like Gimbol lock, which is a known limitation of using Euler angles for representing three-dimensional rotations. You might want to use matrices or quaternions instead to represent your spaceship's rotation.

share|improve this answer
    
I read about those, but I thought I was using matrices. What am I missing? – Dahud Jul 14 '11 at 20:09
    
Sorry, I misread your question and thought that you weren't using matrices. I'll delete my answer. – Na7coldwater Jul 14 '11 at 20:15
    
Undeleting since Goz seemed to think I might have been right. – Na7coldwater Jul 15 '11 at 1:01

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