Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am looking for ideas for my undergraduate project and I quite like the area of High Performance Computing , has got a lot of scope for research . Are there any ideas / already existing open source projects worth looking at ?

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by High Performance Mark, RAS, talonmies, Luv, Cupcake Jul 18 '13 at 7:33

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
This question is off-topic, SO doesn't recommend projects for students. –  High Performance Mark Jul 18 '13 at 6:24
add comment

3 Answers

One hot field right now is in the area of algorithmic trading. You can sign up for $3000 (if you're under 21 -- it's $10k for over 21) at InteractiveBrokers.com and they will give you a free paper trading account (which is fake money traded using realtime data) of $10,000,000. They have API's in C#, C++, VB, Java and reasonable support... You could write your own stock pair trading algorithm. They have good documentation on how to get started.

You can scale this as high as you want, also a lot of people do high frequency trading which requires hpc and in-depth knowledge of Unix and C++.

Worth looking into, my 2 cents.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Perhaps massively parallel processing? Libraries like Cuda, OpenCL, and DirectCompute are just blossoming, and have a high likelihood of becoming commonplace. In my company, we are researching uses for OpenCL, and we're finding that it has the potential to revolutionize our industry.

Just a thought.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I would suggest looking at Sandia National Labs's SST (The Structural Simulation Toolkit). Its a highly parallel simulator framework used for HPC. It uses and incorporates other simulators from academia and industry. For instance, it currently integrates GEM5, QSim, MacSim, DRAMSim, Merlin, Portals, DRAMSim2, Iris, etc. Moreover, it is open source so you can contribute to the development.

You could work on integrating other academia components into SST, improve the interface of one of the components with SST, or just improve of the components themselves.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.