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I want to ask on how exactly the java updates are done.
I mean, ok they are done automatically, but which part/how exactly does this process happen?
To give a specific example why I am asking this:
I have a java project that has as part of it, the specific jre that it needs and uses that at runtime so that there is no expectation of what Java is installed in the system, if it is installed etc.
The project's jre is part of the project's deployment i.e. not under C:\Program Files\jre for instance.
I am starting to wonder if in this case the update process will work i.e. the project's jre will actually be updated by the java scheduler (?) or what is that does the update or not.
So will it happen automatically or this is something I have to take into consideration??
Any input is highly welcome

UPDATE:
I do not want to avoid the update!!!
I am interested to know if in my case the automatic update will actually happen or there is a configuration needed specifically for my case

Thank you

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

First Question I would ask is:

How do you plan to install the application? Don't you need the native JRE to install your own JRE and your java application? It sounds like a chicken and egg scenario.

I am starting to wonder if in this case the update process will work i.e. the project's jre will actually be updated by the java scheduler (?) or what is that does the update or not.

No, the automatic JRE update (if that's how it's set on that client machine) should not impact your application. I am assuming you are launching the JVM with hard coded path to your self packaged JRE.

So will it happen automatically or this is something I have to take into consideration??

The regular client JRE updates will happen automatically if that's how it's set up on the machine. You will not need to worry about it unless your application interacts with the browsers (or other system applications that utilizes native JRE) since they will by default use the system/OS JRE and not your packaged ones. Your packaged JRE will obviously stay at the same version unless you update it with your application updates.

some advice:

I am not sure why you are packaging the JRE with your distribution. Most machines now a days have JRE pre-installed. Perhaps you can explain your application scenario to us. Also this contradicts the principles of platform independence.

share|improve this answer
    
CoolBean:Concerning your first point, no I do not need the JRE to install mine.I just have the JRE folder with everything in it.Now there is a misunderstanding.I actually want my JRE to be updated and not avoid it.I will update the post.I am not sure if this is possible with the JRE as I mention.Is it?Is configuration needed?Concerning your last question you are more or less correct.This is something I inherited and I believe that they needed to make sure that for instance Java5 is not in the deployed machine since all features are from Java6.One example is this – Cratylus Jul 14 '11 at 21:00
    
CoolBean:You are also right, the path to JRE is hard coded to link to my jre – Cratylus Jul 14 '11 at 21:19
    
@user384706: As I mentioned - you cant get automatic updates if your JRE is packaged with the app. You can manually send updates to the client machines for your app where you can update the JRE. – CoolBeans Jul 14 '11 at 21:23
    
This is useful info for me.You mean that all I can do is just deliver the updated JRE as part of a next installation?Isn't there any program inside the JRE that one could manually run to download the updates?Does't juched.exe do that?Or for my case this will not work either? – Cratylus Jul 14 '11 at 21:57
    
@user384706: Correct. jucheck.exe and jusched.exe are the two services that performs the updates. There may be some hacks to get do it otherwise but I cant think of any at the moment. – CoolBeans Jul 14 '11 at 22:12

What you mean by "specific JRE", rt.jar or something else ?

I think you take it from the wrong end - if the update can be a problem for you, why you just don't set you environment so the update does not affect your application whatever it modifies ?

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1  
Actually he wants to get the updates applied to his internally packaged JRE and delivered by Java automatic update scheduler (jusched.exe). He is not trying to avoid the JRE updates. So basically he wants to know if there is a way to make the Java automatic update do both the native JRE update as well as his own packaged one. – CoolBeans Jul 14 '11 at 22:16
    
Yes!CoolBeans is on the point! – Cratylus Jul 14 '11 at 22:18

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