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Anyone knows any efficient method of perform an animation that what is has to do is to display a text, character by character?, like:

T
Th
Thi
This
This i
This is
...

and so on.

Thanks!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 34 down vote accepted

This may not be the most elegant solution, but the simplest is probably a quick subclass of TextView with a Handler that updates the text every so often until the complete sequence is displayed:

public class Typewriter extends TextView {

    private CharSequence mText;
    private int mIndex;
    private long mDelay = 500; //Default 500ms delay


    public Typewriter(Context context) {
        super(context);
    }

    public Typewriter(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        super(context, attrs);
    }

    private Handler mHandler = new Handler();
    private Runnable characterAdder = new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            setText(mText.subSequence(0, mIndex++));
            if(mIndex <= mText.length()) {
                mHandler.postDelayed(characterAdder, mDelay);
            }
        }
    };

    public void animateText(CharSequence text) {
        mText = text;
        mIndex = 0;

        setText("");
        mHandler.removeCallbacks(characterAdder);
        mHandler.postDelayed(characterAdder, mDelay);
    }

    public void setCharacterDelay(long millis) {
        mDelay = millis;
    }
}

You can then use this in an Activity like so:

public class MyActivity extends Activity {
    @Override
    public void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        super.onCreate(savedInstanceState);
        Typewriter writer = new Typewriter(this);
        setContentView(writer);

        //Add a character every 150ms
        writer.setCharacterDelay(150);
        writer.animateText("Sample String");
    }
}

If you want some animation effects with each letter added, perhaps look at subclassing TextSwitcher instead.

Hope that Helps!

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1  
This is precisely what I was looking for, thank you very much –  zegnus Jul 16 '11 at 11:35
1  
Super greattttttt :-) how can I do if i want to to use layout a xml layout as a background and benefit from that animation? or how can i do add a special background to the writter?? –  youssoua May 24 '12 at 13:21
    
youssoua, depending on which package your Typewriter class is in, you would use something like <com.yourpackage.somethingTypewriter instead of <TextView in your xml layout. As it is a TextView still, you can use all of the xml attributes you usually would. –  NutterzUK Mar 28 at 10:31

No need to set an extra class Use this, here tv is a textview in your layout just call

setCharacterDelay(150);
animateText("Sample String");

private Handler mHandler = new Handler();
private Runnable characterAdder = new Runnable() {
@Override
public void run() {
    tv.setText(mText.subSequence(0, mIndex++));
    if(mIndex <= mText.length()) {
        mHandler.postDelayed(characterAdder, mDelay);
    }
}
};

public void animateText(CharSequence text) {
mText = text;
mIndex = 0;

tv.setText("");
mHandler.removeCallbacks(characterAdder);
mHandler.postDelayed(characterAdder, mDelay);
}

public void setCharacterDelay(long millis) {
mDelay = millis;
}
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this new copy for Devunwired with xml layout

    public class Typewriter extends TextView {

    private CharSequence mText;
    private int mIndex;
    private long mDelay = 500; //Default 500ms delay


    public Typewriter(Context context) {
        super(context);
    }

    public Typewriter(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        super(context, attrs);
    }

    private Handler mHandler = new Handler();
    private Runnable characterAdder = new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            textView.setText(mText.subSequence(0, mIndex++));
            if(mIndex <= mText.length()) {
                mHandler.postDelayed(characterAdder, mDelay);
            }
        }
    };

    public void animateText(CharSequence text) {
        mText = text;
        mIndex = 0;

        textView.setText("");
        mHandler.removeCallbacks(characterAdder);
        mHandler.postDelayed(characterAdder, mDelay);
    }

    public void setCharacterDelay(long millis) {
        mDelay = millis;
    }
}

code use

        textView = (TextView)findViewById(R.id.textView1);
    //Add a character every 150ms
    writer.setCharacterDelay(150);
    writer.animateText("Sample String");

then define textView in classStart

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use Devunwired's Typewriter class

then, in the layout:

<com.example.fmm.Typewriter
    android:id="@+id/typewriter"
    android:layout_alignParentTop="true"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="wrap_content"/>

code in the activity:

Typewriter writer = (Typewriter)findViewById(R.id.typewriter);
        //Add a character every 150ms
        writer.setCharacterDelay(150);
        writer.animateText("Sample String");
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In theory it would be


string text = "hello"
string temp = "h"

iterate: temp += if (text.length > temp.length) text[temp.length]; wait

You will of course do the iterate in your runmethod.

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Kaj's answer is mostly correct, but I wanted to expand on it a bit. Basically, as he said, you'll want to maintain a copy of the complete string, as well as a "display string" which contains only the part of the string actually being drawn on screen. Every so often, you'll concatenate an extra character from the full string onto the display string, and then redraw the display string.

If you were creating a game using a simple main-loop architecture, you'd do this in some subfunction of the main loop. You could ensure that it only occurs every so often by tracking the time delta from the last occurrence. I think that is what Kaj is referring to by "runmethod." However, since you've not mentioned anything about a game, I assume that that's not what you're doing, and UI-centric Java applications will take a bit of a different approach.

By subclassing TimerTask and creating a Timer, you can set your string concatenation and redrawing method to be called as often as you'd like. Basically, you'll override the run method of TimerTask to update your string and redraw it, as described previously.

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