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In Perl, which of the following regex constructs would be the fastest?

  1. /foo(?>.*?bar)/s
  2. /foo(?:(?!bar).)*+bar/s
  3. /foo(?:[^b]++|b(?!ar))*+bar/

For large strings with large distance between foo and bar (with moderate b content). (PCRE answers would also be interesting.)

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No answer can be complete without the input data. A regexp that performs comparatively well against one string may not do so well against another. Also, older versions of Perl didn't do as good a job with alternation as newer versions, so the answer will also be somewhat version dependent. –  DavidO Jul 15 '11 at 2:22
    
Perl 5.12 or newer. Whatever input data and version you might have an answer for, it would be valuable. –  Qtax Jul 15 '11 at 2:39

3 Answers 3

use Benchmark;

to find out exact measurements.

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Since this is easy enough to test, I assume you're asking either as a brain teaser or as a way of checking your own assumptions; I'll bite. ;)

I'd expect #3 to be fastest. .*?bar is effectively the same as (?:(?!bar).)*, so #1 and #2 both have to do a lookahead at every position. #3 only does one whenever it sees a b.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted
  1. ab(?>.*?cd)
  2. ab(?:(?!cd).)*+cd
  3. ab(?:[^c]++|c(?!d))*+cd

In the simple case as in the question above, with a long test string, and the following code on Perl 5.12, the answer is that the first regex beats the others by far, the second one being the slowest (as suspected).

These were the results in iterations per second (scaled to the slowest one):

  1. 23.49 x iter/sec
  2. 1.00 x iter/sec
  3. 3.35 x iter/sec

Using the code:

use v5.12;
use Benchmark qw(:hireswallclock :all);

my $str = '';
my $ab = 'ab' x 1024**2;
$str .= $ab . 'cd';
$str .= $ab . 'cde';
$str .= $ab . 'cdef';
$str .= $ab . 'cdefg';
$str .= $ab . 'cdefgh';

printf "Test string length: %.2f MiB\n", (length($str)/1024**2);

timethese(-10, {
    '0:index'       => sub { index($str, 'cdefgh') },

    '1:match'       => sub { $str =~ /ab(?>.*?cdefgh)/ },
    '1:fail'        => sub { $str =~ /ab(?>.*?cdefgg)/ },

    '2:match'       => sub { $str =~ /ab(?:(?!cdefgh).)*+cdefgh/ },
    '2:fail'        => sub { $str =~ /ab(?:(?!cdefgg).)*+cdefgg/ },

    '3:match'       => sub { $str =~ /ab(?:[^c]++|c(?!defgh))*+cdefgh/ },
    '3:fail'        => sub { $str =~ /ab(?:[^c]++|c(?!defgg))*+cdefgg/ },
});

Output:

Test string length: 10.00 MiB
Benchmark: running 0:index, 1:fail, 1:match, 2:fail, 2:match, 3:fail, 3:match for at least 10 CPU seconds...
   0:index: 11.0578 wallclock secs (10.00 usr +  0.00 sys = 10.00 CPU) @ 246.70/s (n=2467)
    1:fail: 11.0379 wallclock secs (10.05 usr +  0.00 sys = 10.05 CPU) @ 245.05/s (n=2462)
   1:match: 11.9981 wallclock secs (10.08 usr +  0.00 sys = 10.08 CPU) @ 63.80/s (n=643)
    2:fail: 12.0531 wallclock secs (10.53 usr +  0.00 sys = 10.53 CPU) @ 255.25/s (n=2688)
   2:match: 11.0573 wallclock secs (10.13 usr +  0.00 sys = 10.13 CPU) @  2.67/s (n=27)
    3:fail: 12.8325 wallclock secs (10.78 usr +  0.00 sys = 10.78 CPU) @ 266.58/s (n=2874)
   3:match: 11.8457 wallclock secs (10.09 usr +  0.00 sys = 10.09 CPU) @  9.31/s (n=94)

Failing is fast in these cases. That seems to be due to that Perl probably does a scan for all plain submatch strings first, and fails if those are not found (same speed as index).

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