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How can I get reference to the task my code is executed within?

ISomeInterface impl = new SomeImplementation();
Task.Factory.StartNew(() => impl.MethodFromSomeInterface(), new MyState());

...

void MethodFromSomeInterface()
{
    Task currentTask = Task.GetCurrentTask();    // No such method?
    MyState state = (MyState) currentTask.AsyncState();
}

Since I'm calling some interface method, I can't just pass the newly created task as an additional parameter.

share|improve this question
    
Can you pass it as a parameter to SomeImplementation's constructor? Even better IMO, pass MyState to the constructor and not require Task knowledge within MethodFromSomeInterface at all. – Stephen Cleary Jul 14 '11 at 23:00
    
@Stephen Cleary, Seems like he can't change the interface. – Filip Ekberg Jul 14 '11 at 23:02
    
I can't change the interface, nor the implementation. So, I do need to associate MyState instance with the current Task. – Reuven Bass Jul 14 '11 at 23:14
    
Moreover, MethodFromSomeInterface may be called concurrently within different tasks. – Reuven Bass Jul 14 '11 at 23:25
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you can't change the interface nor the implementation, you'll have to do it yourself, e.g., using ThreadStaticAttribute:

static class SomeInterfaceTask
{
  [ThreadStatic]
  static Task Current { get; set; }
}

...

ISomeInterface impl = new SomeImplementation();
Task task = null;
task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
  SomeInterfaceTask.Current = task;
  impl.MethodFromSomeInterface();
}, new MyState());

...

void MethodFromSomeInterface()
{
  Task currentTask = SomeInterfaceTask.Current;
  MyState state = (MyState) currentTask.AsyncState();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Is this really thread safe? In fact, is anything beside using lambda parameter in StartNew thread safe? It seems to me that the task variable could get out of scope before the lambda even runs. – wilx Nov 29 '11 at 9:45
    
ThreadStatic is a different thing than TaskStatic would be, if it existed. This may be safe with the default scheduler, but there is no guarantee that a thread will not be reused for multiple tasks, in which case this does not have the protection you may be expecting. This might be the worst kind of bug -- looks good, runs good (usually), and then somewhere down there is a difficult-to-reproduce error. – danwyand Jun 6 '13 at 18:53
    
With this code, Current is always set (on the same thread) immediately before MethodFromSomeInterface is invoked. It doesn't matter if the thread is reused for another task. – Stephen Cleary Jun 6 '13 at 19:29
1  
I see what you're saying now. But the thread pool will never do that; any (fully-synchronous) work queued to the thread pool, once it has started, will always run to completion. To implement "suspend the currently-running task and run another task instead on this same thread" would be incredibly complex and result in worse performance and throughput, so there is no reason to believe that the thread pool will ever do that. – Stephen Cleary Jun 24 '13 at 22:11
2  
There's a race condition between setting task object in task = Task.Factory.StartNew... and SomeInterfaceTask.Current = task;... – thab Oct 1 '15 at 13:01

The following example shows how it can be achieved, resolving the issue with the answer provided by @stephen-cleary. It is a bit convoluted but essentially the key is in the TaskContext class below which uses CallContext.LogicalSetData, CallContext.LogicalGetData and CallContext.FreeNamedDataSlot which are useful for creating your own Task contexts. The rest of the fluff is to answer the OP's question:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var t1 = Task.Factory.StartNewWithContext(async () => { await DoSomething(); });
        var t2 = Task.Factory.StartNewWithContext(async () => { await DoSomething(); });

        Task.WaitAll(t1, t2);
    }

    private static async Task DoSomething()
    {
        var id1 = TaskContext.Current.Task.Id;
        Console.WriteLine(id1);
        await Task.Delay(1000);

        var id2 = TaskContext.Current.Task.Id;
        Console.WriteLine(id2);
        Console.WriteLine(id1 == id2);
    }
}

public static class TaskFactoryExtensions
{
    public static Task StartNewWithContext(this TaskFactory factory, Action action)
    {
        Task task = null;

        task = new Task(() =>
        {
            Debug.Assert(TaskContext.Current == null);
            TaskContext.Current = new TaskContext(task);
            try
            {
                action();
            }
            finally
            {
                TaskContext.Current = null;
            }
        });

        task.Start();

        return task;
    }

    public static Task StartNewWithContext(this TaskFactory factory, Func<Task> action)
    {
        Task<Task> task = null;

        task = new Task<Task>(async () =>
        {
            Debug.Assert(TaskContext.Current == null);
            TaskContext.Current = new TaskContext(task);
            try
            {
                await action();
            }
            finally
            {
                TaskContext.Current = null;
            }
        });

        task.Start();

        return task.Unwrap();
    }
}

public sealed class TaskContext
{
    // Use your own unique key for better performance
    private static readonly string contextKey = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();

    public TaskContext(Task task)
    {
        this.Task = task;
    }

    public Task Task { get; private set; }

    public static TaskContext Current
    {
        get { return (TaskContext)CallContext.LogicalGetData(contextKey); }
        internal set
        {
            if (value == null)
            {
                CallContext.FreeNamedDataSlot(contextKey);
            }
            else
            {
                CallContext.LogicalSetData(contextKey, value);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here is a "hacky" class that can be used for that.
Just use the CurrentTask property to get the current running Task.
I strongly advise against using it anywhere near production code!

public static class TaskGetter
{
    private static string _propertyName;
    private static Type _taskType;
    private static PropertyInfo _property;
    private static Func<Task> _getter;

    static TaskGetter()
    {
        _taskType = typeof(Task);
        _propertyName = "InternalCurrent";
        SetupGetter();
    }

    public static void SetPropertyName(string newName)
    {
        _propertyName = newName;
        SetupGetter();
    }

    public static Task CurrentTask
    {
        get
        {
            return _getter();
        }
    }

    private static void SetupGetter()
    {
        _getter = () => null;
        _property = _taskType.GetProperties(BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.NonPublic).Where(p => p.Name == _propertyName).FirstOrDefault();
        if (_property != null)
        {
            _getter = () =>
            {
                var val = _property.GetValue(null);
                return val == null ? null : (Task)val;
            };
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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