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How can I get reference to the task my code is executed within?

ISomeInterface impl = new SomeImplementation();
Task.Factory.StartNew(() => impl.MethodFromSomeInterface(), new MyState());

...

void MethodFromSomeInterface()
{
    Task currentTask = Task.GetCurrentTask();    // No such method?
    MyState state = (MyState) currentTask.AsyncState();
}

Since I'm calling some interface method, I can't just pass the newly created task as an additional parameter.

share|improve this question
    
Can you pass it as a parameter to SomeImplementation's constructor? Even better IMO, pass MyState to the constructor and not require Task knowledge within MethodFromSomeInterface at all. –  Stephen Cleary Jul 14 '11 at 23:00
    
@Stephen Cleary, Seems like he can't change the interface. –  Filip Ekberg Jul 14 '11 at 23:02
    
I can't change the interface, nor the implementation. So, I do need to associate MyState instance with the current Task. –  Reuven Bass Jul 14 '11 at 23:14
    
Moreover, MethodFromSomeInterface may be called concurrently within different tasks. –  Reuven Bass Jul 14 '11 at 23:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Since you can't change the interface nor the implementation, you'll have to do it yourself, e.g., using ThreadStaticAttribute:

static class SomeInterfaceTask
{
  [ThreadStatic]
  static Task Current { get; set; }
}

...

ISomeInterface impl = new SomeImplementation();
Task task = null;
task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
  SomeInterfaceTask.Current = task;
  impl.MethodFromSomeInterface();
}, new MyState());

...

void MethodFromSomeInterface()
{
  Task currentTask = SomeInterfaceTask.Current;
  MyState state = (MyState) currentTask.AsyncState();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Is this really thread safe? In fact, is anything beside using lambda parameter in StartNew thread safe? It seems to me that the task variable could get out of scope before the lambda even runs. –  Václav Zeman Nov 29 '11 at 9:45
    
ThreadStatic is a different thing than TaskStatic would be, if it existed. This may be safe with the default scheduler, but there is no guarantee that a thread will not be reused for multiple tasks, in which case this does not have the protection you may be expecting. This might be the worst kind of bug -- looks good, runs good (usually), and then somewhere down there is a difficult-to-reproduce error. –  danwyand Jun 6 '13 at 18:53
    
With this code, Current is always set (on the same thread) immediately before MethodFromSomeInterface is invoked. It doesn't matter if the thread is reused for another task. –  Stephen Cleary Jun 6 '13 at 19:29
    
@StephenCleary that is incorrect -- there is no locking around the task variable being set and being read. Using this model, you could set the task in the Current variable; then before the method is invoked, another task is started on the same thread and the same memory location is overwritten. The first task will then read the wrong value. If a particular TPL scheduler is non-preemptive, this will indeed work; but that is not a safe assumption to make in this context. –  danwyand Jun 24 '13 at 20:16
1  
I see what you're saying now. But the thread pool will never do that; any (fully-synchronous) work queued to the thread pool, once it has started, will always run to completion. To implement "suspend the currently-running task and run another task instead on this same thread" would be incredibly complex and result in worse performance and throughput, so there is no reason to believe that the thread pool will ever do that. –  Stephen Cleary Jun 24 '13 at 22:11

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