Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a python script that I run to populate my database. I usually run the script inside shell_plus because of the dependencies required. Is there a way to load the script into shell_plus and run everything from my linux command line without actually opening the shell_plus interface?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

"Standalone Django scripts"

share|improve this answer
    
i tried running $ DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE=myproject.settings PYTHONPATH=$HOME/djangoprojects python myscript.py , but it seems it still cannot find my model class. is there something i may be missing? –  prostock Aug 15 '11 at 18:29

You bet!

I don't even recommend using shell_plus. I tend to store my utilities scripts in my app utility folder. Then I simply call them from a cron job or manually as needed. Here is framework script I base this off of. (Somewhat simplified)

#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
import os
import sys
import logging
import time
import time
import optparse

# DO NOT IMPORT DJANGO MODELS HERE - THIS NEED TO HAPPEN BELOW!!
# This needs to be able to be run when django isn't in the picture (cron) so we need
# to be able to add in the django paths when needed.

def getArgs():
    """
        Simply get the options for running update people.
    """

    p = optparse.OptionParser()

    help = "The Python path to a settings module, e.g. "
    help += "\"myproject.settings.main\". If this isn't provided, the "
    help += "DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE environment variable will be used."
    p.add_option("-s", "--settings", action = "store", type = "string",
                 dest = "settings", help = help)

    help = "A directory to add to the Python path, e.g."
    help += " \"/home/djangoprojects/myproject\"."
    p.add_option("-y", "--pythonpath", action = "store", type = "string",
                 dest = "pythonpath", help = help)
    p.add_option("-v", "--verbose", action = "count", dest = "verbose",
                 help = "Turn on verbose debugging")
    p.set_defaults(settings = os.environ.get("DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE",
                                              "settings"),
                   pythonpath = "", verbose = 0,
                   )

    return p.parse_args()


def update(opt, loglevel=None):
    """
        This is the main script used for updating people
    """

    start = time.time()

    # This ensures that our sys.path is ready.
    for path in opt.pythonpath.split(":"):
        if os.path.abspath(path) not in sys.path and os.path.isdir(path):
            sys.path.append(os.path.abspath(path))
    os.environ['DJANGO_SETTINGS_MODULE'] = opt.settings

    from django.conf import settings    
    try:
        if settings.SITE_ROOT not in sys.path: pass
    except ImportError:
        return("Your setting file cannot be imported - not in sys.path??")

    # IMPORT YOUR CODE MODELS HERE
    from apps.core.utility.ExampleExtractor import ExampleExtractor

    # YOUR DJANGO STUFF GOES HERE..
    example = ExampleExtractor(loglevel=loglevel, singleton=not(opt.multiple))
    raw = example.get_raw()
    results = example.update_django(raw)

    log.info("Time to update %s entries : %s" % (len(results), time.time() - start))
    return results


if __name__ == '__main__':

    logging.basicConfig(format = "%(asctime)s %(levelname)-8s %(module)s \
      %(funcName)s %(message)s", datefmt = "%H:%M:%S", stream = sys.stderr)
    log = logging.getLogger("")
    log.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

    opts, args = getArgs()
    sys.exit(update(opts))

HTH!

share|improve this answer
    
I just used this script and it is awesome. I have been programming Django for a year and whilst I am getting pretty good I never did the initial playing around at command line level. My site is nearly ready for production and needs some Python cron jobs. I used this script and got it all running really nicely. Thanks rh0dium –  Rich Jul 30 '12 at 5:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.