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I have a database with ~100,000 entries - right now my query looks like this:

SELECT id,zipcode,price FROM listings WHERE zipcode IN (96815 , 96815, 96835, 96828, 96830, 96826, 96836, 96844, 96816, 96847, 96814, 96822, 96823, 96843, 96805, 96806, 96810, 96848, 96808, 96809, 96842, 96839, 96802, 96812, 96804, 96803, 96840, 96807, 96813, 96841, 96801, 96850, 96811, 96898, 96837, 96827, 96824, 96846, 96821, 96817, 96859, 96838, 96819, 96820, 96858, 96849, 96825, 96795, 96863, 96818, 96853, 96861, 96734, 96744, 96701, 96860, 96709, 96782, 96706, 96797, 96862, 96789, 96707, 96730, 96854, 96759, 96786, 96857, 96717, 96792, 96762, 96712, 96791, 96731) AND (price BETWEEN 1000 AND 1200) ORDER BY id

This query worked fine when I had only 50,000 entries, but its getting really slow when I extend the radius of the zip codes (which results in even more zip codes in the in clause).

id int(8) AUTO_INCREMENT price mediumint(7) zipcode mediumint(5)

All three fields are indexed. Does anyone have an idea how i could optimize it? Thanks guys

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I am pretty sure that if you have that many zip codes in an IN clause even if the field is indexed it will run slow. I am not sure how to fix this though besides limiting the number of zips. –  Chris Muench Jul 14 '11 at 23:48
    
I can see duplicated values in the list of zip code. Make sure you only give distinct values and increments. –  ysrb Jul 14 '11 at 23:50
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

ZIP codes are generally geographically distributed -- you might be able to speed things up by simplifying the ZIP code clause to something like:

zipcode BETWEEN 96700 AND 96898

This may end up inadvertently including some zip codes that you didn't want, but it may end up being more efficient to filter them out later.

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Sounds plausible - seems it helps a bit –  Manuel Jul 15 '11 at 0:06
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There is a big difference between each field being indexed and fields being indexed correctly. As far as I can see you only need one index to make your query run faster

Try create an index with the following columns (zipcode, price)

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The problem is that I have other queries as well (so I need the index for the other two columns). The main concern is the zip query. –  Manuel Jul 15 '11 at 2:21
    
That's fine if the indexes are used by other queries, but what I meant was that, just because you have an index on a column, it does not mean that your query can use it. Create the index with both columns in it and let me know if it helps. –  John Petrak Jul 15 '11 at 4:36
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