Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to run a few tasks in shell.

  1. tail a file into a new file: for example: tail -f debug|tee -a test.log
  2. at the same time, run other tasks.

My question is: how to make the command tail -f debug|tee -a test.log run in background, so that I can run other tasks then in shell script?

share|improve this question
1  
Usually, it is easiest to use a second window/terminal. Typing commands while log output is also going to the screen is a frustrating experience, in my experience. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 15 '11 at 4:46
    
@Jonathan Leffler, thanks for your advice. Yes, I think it is really a frustrating experience to type command while log output in the same screen. –  zhaojing Jul 15 '11 at 5:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need tee at all for this, just use the shell's built-in append operator:

tail -f debug >> test.log &

The trailing & works as normal in the shell. You only need tee to send the output to a file as well as standard out, which if you have it in the background probably isn't what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
evil, thanks for your response:-) –  zhaojing Jul 15 '11 at 3:26
1  
The difference between this and the code using tee is that this does not send the debug output to the terminal - it only sends it to the file. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 15 '11 at 4:45
    
@Jonathan Leffler, thanks for the response, I am much clear about it. –  zhaojing Jul 15 '11 at 5:57
    
but how to stop the tail that run in backgroud? –  zhaojing Jul 15 '11 at 6:05
    
to kill the background tail process, use kill %tail –  evil otto Jul 15 '11 at 16:07

Normally you just use an ampersand after the command if you want to background something.

tail -f debug|tee -a test.log &

Then you can bring it back to the foreground later by typing fg. Did this answer your question or have I missed what you were asking?

share|improve this answer
    
Jason, thanks for your response. I will have a try:-) –  zhaojing Jul 15 '11 at 3:25

The simple way to do this is:

screen -R -D
tail -f debug|tee -a test.log
Ctrl-A c
ps ax |grep tail
Ctrl-A [Backspace]
...
Ctrl-A [Spacebar]

screen lets you run multiple terminal sessions on one terminal connection. You switch back and forth with Ctrl-A [Backspace]|[Space]. To create another separate shell Ctrl-A c

A major benefit of screen is that if the terminal session disconnects, it keeps everything runnning. Just close the terminal window or disconnect ssh, go to another computer, log in and run screen -R -D to reconnect to everything which is still running.

If you only occasionally need this, just run tail, type Ctrl-Z, run a command, then fg %1 to bring the tail process back into the foreground, or bg %1 to make it run in the background permanently. If you do use Ctrl-Z, then the jobs command shows all of your detached jobs.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.