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Python has a nice execfile function inside the interpreter where you can run a program, keep all the variables in scope, and then inspect them at your leisure. However, as far as I know you can't run execfile on a program that takes arguments from the command line; if you try to include the arguments, Python throws an IOError and complains that the file (with spaces and arguments) can't be found.

Is there any way to run a Python script that takes command line arguments, and keep all of the variables in scope after the program executes? Like an execfile that takes flags?

Thanks, Kevin

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This sounds all sorts of messed up. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 15 '11 at 3:35
    
why not use like run blah.py -i 0 -m 1 in ipython –  wim Jul 15 '11 at 3:52
    
You should avoid using execfile whenever possible. It has it's uses, but I don't think this use case is one of them. –  Keith Jul 15 '11 at 4:00
    
Ignacio, could you explain why? I just realized I guess I could run pdb and put a breakpoint right at the end of program execution, then inspect things when the program stops. I just like being able to inspect all the variables without having to change one thing and re-run the program. –  Kevin Burke Jul 15 '11 at 10:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could modify sys.argv directly. The file:

# foo.py
import sys

print sys.argv

The other file:

import sys
import shlex   # thanks Matt

old_argv = sys.argv
sys.argv = shlex.split('foo.py is a happy camper')

execfile('foo.py')

Output:

$ python foo.py is a happy camper
['foo.py', 'is', 'a', 'happy', 'camper']
$ python bar.py 
['foo.py', 'is', 'a', 'happy', 'camper']

But I must say, quoting Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams:

This sounds all sorts of messed up.

I'm assuming you have your reasons though.

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I wouldn't do this either. But if I did, I'd use the shlex module to build my new sys.argv. –  Matt Anderson Jul 15 '11 at 3:45
    
@Matt, not a bad idea, thanks. –  senderle Jul 15 '11 at 3:51
    
Upvote for providing the solution AND quoting Ignacio –  GaretJax Jul 15 '11 at 6:32

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