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I am loading an external class using a class-loader. I have a custom security manager that keeps track of what that class is allowed to do. This works fine. However, I would also like to monitor the memory requirements of that class. In particular, I would like to set a limit on the amount of memory this class may use. I am not able to edit the class in question.

If I understand it correctly, the only way to do this is to invoke a separate JVM. How do I do that? Would I need to wrap everything in a Process? The class I need to execute does not have a main method - it is instantiated by the 'main' program. The idea is to run the program, then instantiate the external class in question and communicate with the resulting object (calling a selection of methods and passing some objects).

Thanks for your time.

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You need to write a short program which has a main, which you can interact with e.g. via Socket/RMI/JMS even Input+OutputStream which will call the library for you.

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Thanks. Just to clarify: I can write some "wrapper" code that establishes the communication between the 'main' program and the external class. Let's say I use sockets. I would assume the 'main' program starts listening on some socket and then instantiates the JVM for the external class. Is that as simple as using System.exec(java ...)? Then the external class connects to the socket. In order to exchange information, I would need to serialise the objects I want to pass - is that correct? –  coderino Jul 19 '11 at 8:42
    
Yes, that is correct. If you only want one stream, you may find using the processes in/out stream is all you need. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 19 '11 at 9:01
    
Great, I will give that a go. –  coderino Jul 19 '11 at 9:50

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