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This is harder than it looks. I need a function that calculates the numbers of a given weekday in a date range. I don't want any loops or recusive sql, there are millions of examples doing just that, I need a fast function for calculation.

Input of the function will be weekday, fromdata, todate

-- counting fridays
set datefirst 1
SELECT dbo.f_countweekdays(5, '2011-07-01', '2011-07-31'),
dbo.f_countweekdays(5, '2011-07-08', '2011-07-15'),
dbo.f_countweekdays(5, '2011-07-09', '2011-07-15'),
dbo.f_countweekdays(5, '2011-07-09', '2011-07-14')

expected result:

5, 2, 1, 0

I hope someone can help.

share|improve this question
    
Sorry about the close vote. Misread the question. – Mikael Eriksson Jul 15 '11 at 10:10
    
My own version works now, is it wrong to post it as an answer or should I add it as part of the question ? It is very different from the current answers. – t-clausen.dk Jul 15 '11 at 11:27
    
You can post it as an answer and I think you should be able to accept your own answer as well. I think there is a time limit before you can accept it. – Mikael Eriksson Jul 15 '11 at 11:30
    
Mikael. Thx. I don't think people should be allowed to choose their own answers. That would lead to abuse. Also in this case I had alot longer to think about it than you had. I am not qualified to estimate which function is fastest. Which in this case will be the function I will use. Any good surgestion of how to compare them ? – t-clausen.dk Jul 15 '11 at 11:44
1  
Tried to do a performance test using a numbers table and executing the function 100000 times. Took 10 seconds and the difference between our two versions was 60 ms. Not sure the test was any good :). – Mikael Eriksson Jul 15 '11 at 12:04
up vote 3 down vote accepted

@Mikael Eriksson has got a wonderful idea, but his implementation seems a bit overcomplicated.

Here's what I've come up with (and I'd like to stress that it is based on the solution by @Mikael, to whom the main credit should go):

ALTER FUNCTION dbo.f_countweekdays (@Dow int, @StartDate datetime, @EndDate datetime)
RETURNS int
AS BEGIN
  RETURN (
    SELECT
      DATEDIFF(wk, @StartDate, @EndDate)
      - CASE WHEN DATEPART(dw, @StartDate) > @Dow THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
      - CASE WHEN DATEPART(dw, @EndDate)   < @Dow THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
      + 1
  )
END

UPDATE

As Mikael has correctly noted in his answer's comment thread, in order for the above solution to work correctly the DATEFIRST setting must be set to 7 (Sunday). Although I couldn't find this documented, a quick test revealed that DATEDIFF(wk) disregards the actual DATEFIRST setting and indeed returns the difference in weeks as if DATEFIRST was always set to 7. At the same time DATEPART(dw) does respect DATEFIRST, so with DATEFIRST set to a value other than 7 the two functions return mutually inconsistent results.

Therefore, the above script must be amended in order to account for different values of the DATEFIRST setting when calculating DATEDIFF(wk). Happily, the fix doesn't seem to have made the solution much more complicated than before, in my opinion. Judge for yourself, though:

ALTER FUNCTION dbo.f_countweekdays (@Dow int, @StartDate datetime, @EndDate datetime)
RETURNS int
AS BEGIN
  RETURN (
    SELECT
      DATEDIFF(wk, DATEADD(DAY, -@@DATEFIRST, @StartDate),
                   DATEADD(DAY, -@@DATEFIRST, @EndDate))
      - CASE WHEN DATEPART(dw, @StartDate) > @Dow THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
      - CASE WHEN DATEPART(dw, @EndDate)   < @Dow THEN 1 ELSE 0 END
      + 1
  )
END

Edited: both -@@DATEFIRST % 7 entries have been simplified to just -@@DATEFIRST, as someone suggested here.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 again if I could. – Mikael Eriksson Jul 15 '11 at 15:25
    
Sorry been away from the internet, + 1 from me as well. Very nice – t-clausen.dk Jul 18 '11 at 14:01
create function dbo.f_countweekdays
(
  @DOW int, 
  @StartDate datetime, 
  @EndDate datetime
) 
returns int
begin
  return
  ( select datediff(wk, T2.St, T2.En) -
           case when T1.SDOW > @DOW then 1 else 0 end -
           case when T1.EDOW < @DOW then 1 else 0 end
    from (select datepart(dw, @StartDate),
                 datepart(dw, @EndDate)) as T1(SDOW, EDOW)
      cross apply (select dateadd(d, - T1.SDOW, @StartDate),
                          dateadd(d, 7 - T1.EDOW, @EndDate)) as T2(St, En))
end
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 this works well. Very fancy. I had a more primitive approch myself when i tried to solve it. – t-clausen.dk Jul 15 '11 at 11:10
    
I like the approach very much, but I think you somewhat overdid it. Please have a look at my solution. – Andriy M Jul 15 '11 at 13:40
1  
@Andriy - I agree. It pretty much shows how I think. I did not take time to clean it up. However, our versions does not do the same thing. Your version requires set datefirst 7 and my requires set datefirst 1. Test dbo.f_countweekdays(5, '2011-07-11', '2011-07-17') – Mikael Eriksson Jul 15 '11 at 13:49
    
You are right, and thank you very much for pointing that out! I don't remember having come across that peculiarity of DATEDIFF which I'm talking about of in my updated answer. It's very good to know this in advance. – Andriy M Jul 15 '11 at 15:00
    
I am very sorry, I accepted Andriy M's solution as being the best. I hope you are ok with that. – t-clausen.dk Jul 18 '11 at 14:33

An alternative approach is the good old-fashioned data warehouse time dimension, where you have a table with all potential dates in it, along with any useful information you want to filter/count by:

Key       ActualDate  DayName   IsWeekday  DayNumberInYear  FinancialQuarter
20110101  1 Jan 2011  Saturday  0          1                2011 Q1
20110102  2 Jan 2011  Sunday    0          2                2011 Q1
20110103  3 Jan 2011  Monday    1          3                2011 Q1

Then just join to that table and filter, e.g.

SELECT 
  COUNT(*) 
FROM 
  date_dimension
WHERE
  ActualDate BETWEEN '1 Jan 2011' AND '3 Jan 2011' AND
  IsWeekday = 1

If you do date analysis a lot over a known range of dates, this can really speed up and simplify your queries. Whether you know your possible date ranges in advance is the limiting factor on whether this is helpful, really, but it's a useful trick to know about.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. This seems like alot of work for 1 little function. – t-clausen.dk Jul 15 '11 at 11:09
    
It is a lot of work for one little function. It gets more useful the more you want to do arbitrary things with dates, though, so I figured I'd mention it. – Matt Gibson Jul 15 '11 at 12:00
    
It is very little work and it is simple. After reading the other solutions here, and the solution that referred me here, I couldn't decide which of them to use because of the level of debate, the talk about the DATEFIRST setting, and the level of expertise required to understand them. So I went for something I understood. – DJDave Feb 18 '14 at 10:15

This is what I came up with after trying alot of different approches. I did spend a long time on solving it and I was still working on it, when I posted the question. I decided to post it as an answer because of the self-learner badge, although I never got more than 2 points for an answer.

alter function dbo.f_countweekdays 
( @day int, @fromdate datetime, @todate datetime )  
returns int 
begin 
RETURN (SELECT datediff(day, @fromdate, dateadd(week,datediff(week,0,@todate - 1) + 
CASE WHEN datepart(weekday,@todate) < @day THEN 0 ELSE 1 END,0) + @day - 1) / 7)
end
share|improve this answer
    
Try this dbo.f_countweekdays(1, '2011-07-15', '2011-07-18'). Wont return the same as mine. – Mikael Eriksson Jul 15 '11 at 11:53
    
It seems like it works now, changed -2 to -1. I have tested some situations. But not all – t-clausen.dk Jul 15 '11 at 12:18

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