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I have 2 activities in my app ActivityA and ActivityB and a count down timer. The timer should keep running between the two activities. If the user clicks on the home or back button the timer will be saved to database and will then continue from the last state on app relaunch.

I am saving to the database in onPuse() and in onBackPressed(). To save data if user clicks on home and back button.

My problem is: If ActivityB is called from ActivityA, then save to database method will be called. How can I avoid it being called unless home button is pressed?

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if you press Home in A then it goes to Home not in B unless you override Home Button press event to trigger B –  Rasel Jul 15 '11 at 9:28
2  
onPause() is automatically called every time the activity gets "hidden", hence every time you press the back button. Btw it's strongly recommended not to override the home button event. –  iDroid Jul 15 '11 at 9:32
2  
@iDroid In fact its not possible to override Home button –  inazaruk Jul 25 '11 at 8:52

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+25

As soon as the timer is created, store the creation time in database and then in each activities onResume just reload the timer starting from current time - created time. Something like this psuedo code

createTimer() {
    createTimerEntryInDB();
    showTimer();
}

showTimer() {
   fetchTimerEntryFromDB();
   populateTimerUI();
}

/* In both activity */
onResume() {
   if (doesTimerExistInDB) {
       showTimer(); 
   }
}
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This is the right approach. Don't forget onPause(){storeTimer();} though. Also, it's possible that your timer will have expired by the time you call onResume. This could happen if you press Home, wait a sufficient amount of time, then re-enter your app (via long-press on Home). So make sure to double check the timer value from your DB in onResume to ensure you're not in the negative. –  Josh Jul 27 '11 at 18:55
    
I guess once it is stored in DB there is no need to restore it in onPause however need to check whether it expired and if it did, it needs to be flushed from DB. –  PravinCG Jul 27 '11 at 18:59
    
Oh yeah, you're right, you saved the original when you created it! –  Josh Jul 27 '11 at 19:07

You could also create a service and bind each activity to it, then expose some general binding methods to access the timer and manipulate it however you wish.

When you close the app unbind the activities as they close, and the service will by default stop itself.

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Instead of one timer between the two Activities, why not use a separate timer and database entry for each and then check if their sum is past the limit.

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Pass the value of the timer to ActivityB. And when returning to the ActivityA ship the value of the timer and start off again from that value. Don't forget to stop and save just before you starting the new intent.

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As I understood your question, if ActivityB is called from ActivityA, you wouldn't like to save the state of the count down in the database. But in any other case you would like to have it saved.

A quite simple solution consists in using a serialization flag:

ActivityA:

public class ActivityA extends Activity {
    private boolean serializationIsEnabled = true; // The flag

    ...

    private void internalLogicOfYourActivity() {
        ...
        // When ActivityA calls ActivityB, it disables the serialization of the timer
        serializationIsEnabled = false;
        startActivityForResult(new Intent(this, ActivityB.class), REQUEST_CODE);
        ...
    }

    @Override
    protected void onActivityResult(int requestCode, int resultCode, Intent intent) {
        if (requestCode == REQUEST_CODE) {
            // We'll be happy to have the serialization working again when we'll be back from ActivityB.
            // A variant of this would be to reset serializationIsEnabled in onResume()
            serializationIsEnabled = true;

            ...
        }
    }

    @Override
    protected void onPause() {
       // Save the state of the timer if the serialization is enabled
       if (serializationIsEnabled) {
          saveCountDownInTheDatabase();
       }

       super.onPause();
    }

    @Override
    public void onBackPressed() {
       // it is not even needed to save the countdown here:
       // onPause() will be called anyway if you press back.

       super.onBackPressed();
    }
}

And ActivityB:

public class ActivityB extends Activity {
    ...

    @Override
    protected void onPause() {
        saveCountDownInTheDatabase();

        super.onPause();
    }

    @Override
    public void onBackPressed() {
       // Same here: it is not needed to save the countdown:
       // onPause() will be called anyway if you press back.

       super.onBackPressed();
    }
}

This way we are good regarding your question.

And if you wouldn't like to save the count down either when coming back from ActivityB to ActivityA, you can apply a similar logic by modifying ActivityB the following way:

public class ActivityB extends Activity {
    private boolean serializationIsEnabled = true; // The flag

    ...

    private void finishWithResult(int result) {
        serializationIsEnabled = false;
        setResult(result);
        finish(); 
    }

    private void internalLogicOfYourActivity() {
        ...
        finishWithResult(RESULT_OK);
        ...
    }

    @Override
    protected void onPause () {
       if (serializationIsEnabled) {
          saveCountDownInTheDatabase();
       }

       super.onPause();
    }

    @Override
    public void onBackPressed() {
        finishWithResult(RESULT_CANCELED);

        super.onBackPressed();
    }
}

This way, if the user does anything else than switching between ActivityA and ActivityB, the countdown is saved in the database. Otherwise it is not.

Keeping the timer running during the switch is not a problem, and neither initializing the timer from the database content. As it doesn't seem to be your question here, let me know whether you would like me to elaborate on this.

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