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I have an oracle table with a sequence and a trigger to autoincrement a column. Now I want to make an insert. Normally I should write:

INSERT INTO table (column1, column2,...) VALUES (value1, value2)

but I just want to insert a record with no default values. How to do this in Oracle?

`Mysql`: INSERT INTO table () VALUES ()

`Mssql`: INSERT INTO table default VALUES 

`Oracle:` INSERT INTO table (column1, column2,...) VALUES (default, default,...)

Is this the only way? I have to list all columns?

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Is it okay to list only one? –  Álvaro G. Vicario Jul 15 '11 at 9:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted
INSERT INTO table (column1) VALUES (default);

The rest will be defaulted!

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Is this the only way? I have to list all columns?

Yes. And it's good practice to always specify all columns in an INSERT statement that you want to supply values for.

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No, you don't have to list all columns. –  Dave Costa Jul 15 '11 at 16:08
1  
OK, all that you want to populate... –  a_horse_with_no_name Jul 15 '11 at 16:12

I missed this part on the first read:

I have an oracle table with a sequence and a trigger to autoincrement a column.

So I assume there is on PK column populated using the sequence, and the others all have default values. Given that, I would do this:

INSERT INTO table (pk_column) VALUES (NULL);

The trigger will override the NULL value (and if it doesn't for some reason, the insert will fail); and the other columns will be populated using defaults.

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You could add a default null to the pk, and then the insert would be insert into table (pk_column) values (default). –  Shannon Severance Jul 15 '11 at 17:19

In Oracle you don't HAVE to specify the columns but not doing so will leave you open to introducing bugs as and when your table definition changes.

You could insert with:

INSERT INTO t VALUES (value1, value2, value3);

This assumes the table t has three columns

It is far better and supportable to insert with:

INSERT INTO t (column1, column2, column3) VALUES (value1, value2, value3);

I wouldn't use PL/SQL (if you can help it) as you introduce context switching from PL/SQL to SQL and then back to PL/SQL again.

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