Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've tried making a package for my python project, and this has an sh script that does some post install python setup.py install for some dependencies/subprojects. But turns out that MacOS installer creates it's own context and screws up some paths so going simply:

  python setup.py install - won't work

One solution that seems to help is to do:

  usr/local/bin/python setup.py install

Now I'm kind of a newbie to MacOS so here are my questions:

  1. Is this the default/standard location of python? What I mean is that I plan to distribute this package so can I expect that a machine that has python installed will have a usr/local/bin/python ?
  2. In case that the answer to 1. is no, how could I get the location to their python installation? $PATH contains a lot more and $PYTHONPATH is not what I'm looking for either.

Regards, Bogdan

share|improve this question
    
Why doesn't it work? –  Kugel Jul 15 '11 at 10:17
    
The MacOS installer will create it's own context while installing the project. So I can't really acces the real $PATH either. The $PATH during installation is /bin:/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/libexec. –  Bogdan Jul 15 '11 at 10:37
    
why do you need to access $PATH ? –  Kugel Jul 15 '11 at 10:40
    
I need access to python. But because the installer creates a different context I can't access it with "python setup.py install" for example because python is no longer part of the new context $PATH. –  Bogdan Jul 15 '11 at 10:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You most certainly can not assume that python is installed there. If python is properly installed, it should be in the $PATH, otherewise you just can't know. I could have installed it at /whatever/snake-program/, if it wasn't in the path, how could you guess?

EDIT: What do you mean $PATH contains a lot more by the way? As long as there aren't more than one python install, that shouldn't matter.

share|improve this answer
    
What I mean is that $PATH contains more than just the path to python. Like my path: /opt/local/bin:/opt/local/sbin:/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7‌​/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/Dev/apache-maven-2.2.1/bin:/Dev/flash_pla‌​yer_update_201002_flash10/Players:/usr/X11/bin:/opt/local/lib/postgresql90/bin , I can't really use this to find the actual path to python. –  Bogdan Jul 15 '11 at 10:17
    
Do you need to? If you can access $PATH in your script, you just need to call python. So I guess you can't access it? –  carlpett Jul 15 '11 at 10:19
    
The MacOS installer will create it's own context while installing the project. So I can't really acces the real $PATH either. The $PATH during installation is /bin:/sbin:/usr/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/libexec. –  Bogdan Jul 15 '11 at 10:36
    
Well, then I don't think there's much you can do acually - you'll have to ask the user about the proper location (of course, you could make a couple of educated guesses first, such as /usr/bin/python and /usr/local/bin/python and only ask if that fails). With a proper path you could call which python to find the location, so you could hint your users to call that (it relies on $PATH being set). –  carlpett Jul 15 '11 at 10:43
    
Ok, thanks for the quick answers. Knew from the start PackageMaker will give me headaches :) –  Bogdan Jul 15 '11 at 10:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.